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[jamsat-news:1717] ANS 146


AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS 146

ANS is a free, weekly, news and information service of AMSAT North
America, the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation. ANS reports on the
activities of a worldwide group of Amateur Radio operators who share an
active interest in designing, building, launching and communicating
through analog and digital Amateur Radio satellites.

ANS is pleased to announce the 20th Space Symposium and AMSAT-NA
Annual Meeting. The conference is scheduled for November 7-11, 2002 in
Fort Worth, Texas, and will chronicle recent and future Amateur Radio
satellite technology developments, including an Electronic Surplus Stores
tour on November 7th; a Field Operations breakfast and a tour of the
Lockheed Martin Aerospace Company on November 10th; and the
AMSAT-NA Board of Directors Meeting November 10th (AMSAT
members are welcome to attend the BOD meeting. [The 2002 event
chairman is Keith Pugh, W5IU]

This ANS bulletin set is dedicated to the memory of Jack Eads, KC8KW,
who his friends report was an "all around good guy with a great love of
ham radio. In his last years, Jack was crippled by emphysema and other
illnesses, but never missed an opportunity to get on the air, however
brief." [ANS thanks Bill Hanrahan, W1WH, for this information]

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-146.01
UNSW BLUESAT PROJECT UPDATE

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE BULLETIN 146.01 FROM AMSAT HQ
SILVER SPRING, MD, MAY 26, 2002
TO ALL RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-146.01

Darran Siu, Electrical Systems Manager for the University of New South
Wales BlueSat Satellite project provided ANS with some current
information about the project.

BlueSat is currently a student project managed and run entirely by
students at The University of New South Wales. It is part of the UNSW
Laboratory for Students Space Development program, a student-led
umbrella body whose purpose is to foster the development of space
related projects at UNSW.

The program aims to create an awareness for space science
developments within the UNSW community, to get students involved in
space related projects using real-world with hands on experience.

The BlueSat project has be helped by the AMSAT-NA Microsat design,
which was kindly supplied by the Australia Space Research Institute
(who received the information originally from AMSAT-NA).

The project has also been helped with the expertise of several
AMSAT-NA members, chief among them AO-40 Team member
Dick Jansson, WD4FAB.

Currently, the design of the satellite it set to support a digital Amateur
Radio communication scheme, however, an FM pent-pipe repeater may
also be included in the final launch design. Frequencies have not yet
been decided.

Stay tuned to ANS for further update.

[ANS thanks the BlueSat Satellite team for this information]

/EX

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-146.02
ANS IN BRIEF

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE BULLETIN 146.02 FROM AMSAT HQ
SILVER SPRING, MD, MAY 26, 2002
TO ALL RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-146.02

ANS news in brief this week includes the following:

** Ham radio is poised yet again to be part of a movie tentatively titled
Phenomenon II. Phenomenon debuted in 1996 and featured John
Travolta and his ham operator friend Forest Whitaker. -ARRL

** NASA and JPL are sending rats to Mars to work as field geologists.
A 'rat' is not quite a furry little friend, but rather a high-tech robot
with
diamond teeth, called a Rock Abrasion Tool (RAT). -SpaceDaily

** A new version of the CCD Display software (CCD Display 2000) is
now available from Colin, VK5HI. This freeware is available at the
following site: http://www.amsat.org/amsat/ftp/software/win95/display.
-Colin VK5HI

** By using an ultra-powerful laser to set off energy bursts lasting a tiny
fraction of a second, scientists may finally be able to see -- and perhaps
control -- what happens in the heart of an atom. The system could also
briefly produce a massive magnetic field resembling that of a white
dwarf star, opening the door to important new experiments in
astrophysics. -SpaceDaily

** The 2001 AMSAT Symposium awards included presentations to
Thomas Maier, Jay Ramdas, Martin Reihle and Heike Straube for
their generous contributions of time and effort during the Phase 3D
launch campaign. Their willingness to sacrifice personal time for this
endeavor is greatly appreciated by hams the world over. -ANS

** NASA-funded research using satellite data has shown large icebergs
that have broken off from Antarctica's Ross Ice Shelf are dramatically
affecting the growth of minute plant life in the ocean around the region;
plant life vital to the local food chain. -SpaceDaily

** The ARRL is reporting the FCC has agreed to a request for a new
secondary HF allocation at 5.25 to 5.4 MHz. The FCC also is ready to
permit operation on a 136-kHz in the low-frequency region. In addition,
the Commission has proposed elevating Amateur Radio to primary
status at 2400 to 2402 MHz. The new 5-MHz band (if authorized)
would be a few years before it actually became available. -ARRL

** Research vehicles in remote outback areas of Australia will soon be
tracked via satellite (and over the Internet) using (new) Vehicle
Tracking Equipment technology that was originally developed to track
animals. -SpaceDaily

** Living underwater parallels living in space in many ways according
to NASA. The time frame for missions involves long periods of time
away from normal environments and families. Communication with
others is not always immediate. NASA is working with experimental
underwater methods that will help future long term space missions.
-SpaceDaily

** A bill introduced in Congress recently could provide relief to amateurs
prevented by private deed covenants, conditions and restrictions. The
bill has been designated H.R. 4720. -ARRL

** Iridium Satellite has signed a service partner agreement with
Australia's largest telephone provider to market and sell Iridium
services. The multi-year deal will enable both companies to retail
Iridium services and equipment to strengthen rural and remote
communications throughout Australia. -SpaceDaily

--ANS BULLETIN END---

/EX

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-146.03
WEEKLY SATELLITE REPORT PART 1

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE BULLETIN 146.03 FROM AMSAT HQ
SILVER SPRING, MD, MAY 26, 2002
TO ALL RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-146.03

Phase 3D / AMSAT OSCAR 40 / AO-40
Launched: November 16, 2000 aboard an Ariane 5 launcher
from Kourou, French Guiana.
Status: Currently, the U/L-1 to S-2 passband is active (various times)
Uplink     U-band    435.550 - 435.800 MHz CW/SSB
                   L1-band  1269.250 - 1269.500 MHz CW/SSB
                   L2-band  1268.325 - 1268.575 MHz CW/SSB
Downlink   S-band  2401.225 - 2401.475 MHz CW/SSB
  K-band  24,048.010 - 24.048.060 MHz CW/SSB

AO-40 experimental transponder operation started on May 05, 2001 at
approximately 08:00 UTC when the U-band and L1-band uplinks were
connected to the S-2 transmitter passband downlink via the Matrix
switch. Some 58 DXCC countries were QRV on AO-40 in 2001.

Gerald, DL1RG, reports his AO-40 log shows 802 contacts with 503
unique calls in 64 DXCC countries (and all continents) during the
last year.

Ground stations capturing telemetry from AO-40 are asked to send a
copy of the data to the AO-40 archive at: ao40-archive@amsat.org.

For the current transponder-operating schedule visit:

http://www.amsat-dl.org/journal/adlj-p3d.htm

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA, AMSAT-DL and the ARRL for this information]

INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION/ARISS
Worldwide packet uplink:  145.990 MHz
Region 1 voice uplink:       145.200 MHz
Region 2/3 voice uplink:    144.490 MHz
Worldwide downlink:         145.800 MHz
TNC callsign                      RS0ISS

The ARISS initial station was launched September 2000 aboard shuttle
Atlantis. ARISS is made up of delegates from several major, national
Amateur Radio organizations, including AMSAT.

Status: Operational.

ISS packet activity has resumed. Although the mailbox function has
been activated, ground stations are discouraged from using it. Currently,
there is no computer hooked up to the packet system.

ARISS school contacts will resume in late June after the Expedition 5
crew of mission commander/U.S. astronaut Peggy Whitson, KC5ZTD,
and Russian cosmonauts Valeri Korzun and Sergei Treschev settles in
aboard ISS.

The latest ARISS announcements and successful school list is
available at:

http://ariss.gsfc.nasa.gov

An archive of school contacts can be found at:

http://www.msnbc.com/news/505064.asp

NASA information on the ISS station can be found at:

http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/station/reference/radio/

The ISS daily crew schedule (which gives an idea when crew members
have free time and may be available for Amateur Radio operations) can
be found at:

http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/station/timelines/2001/may/index.html

A detailed breakdown of the antenna installation with some great
pictures and diagrams (depicting the entire ISS ham system including
antenna's) can be downloaded at:

http://ariss.gsfc.nasa.gov/EVAs/amsat01.pdf

U.S. callsign:                  NA1SS
Russian callsigns:          RS0ISS, RZ3DZR

The QSL routes for W/VE stations working NA1SS aboard the
International Space Station:

U.S. stations (a SASE is required to get a QSL in return):
Margie Bourgoin, KC1DCO
Attn: ARISS Expedition-1 (or 2, 3) QSL
ARRL, 225 Main Street
Newington, Connecticut 06111

Canadian stations:
Radio Amateurs of Canada
Attn: ARISS Expedition-1 (or 2, 3) QSL
720 Belfast Road, Suite 217
Ottawa, Ontario KEG 0Z5

European stations (a SASE and 2 IRC's are required to get
                               a QSL in return).
AMSAT-France
14 bis, rue des Gourlis
92500 Rueil Malmaison
France

[ANS thanks Will Marchant, KC6ROL, and Jean-Louis Rault, F6AGR,
for this information]

RADIO SPORT RS-12
Uplink   21.210 to 21.250 MHz CW/SSB
Downlink 29.410 to 29.450 MHz CW/SSB
Beacon   29.408 MHz
Robot  29.454 MHz
Launched: February 5, 1991 aboard a Russian Cosmos C launcher
Status: RS-12 was placed in Mode-K on February 19, 2002.

The latest information on RS-12 and RS-13 can be found on the AC5DK
RS-12/13 Satellite Operators page at:

http://www.qsl.net/ac5dk/rs1213/rs1213.html

[ANS thanks Kevin Manzer, AC5DK, for RS-12 information]

RADIO SPORT RS-13
Uplink     21.260 to 21.300 MHz CW/SSB
Downlink    145.860 to 145.900 MHz CW/SSB
Beacon  145.860 MHz
Robot  145.908 MHz
Launched: February 5, 1991 aboard a Russian Cosmos C launcher
Status: RS-13 was re-activated in Mode-T on February 19, 2002.

The latest information on RS-12 and RS-13 can be found on the AC5DK
RS-12/13 Satellite Operators page at:

http://www.qsl.net/ac5dk/rs1213/rs1213.html

[ANS thanks Kevin Manzer, AC5DK, for this information]

RADIO SPORT RS-15
Uplink     145.858 to 145.898 MHz CW/SSB
Downlink  29.354 to 29.394 MHz CW/SSB
Beacon   29.352 MHz (intermittent)
SSB meeting frequency     29.380 MHz (unofficial)
Launched: December 26, 1994 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome
Status: Semi-operational, mode-A, using a 2-meter uplink and a
10-meter downlink

Dave, WB6LLO, has operating information for both RS-15 on his
web site. In addition to satellite data, antenna information for
mode-A operation is also featured. The WB6LLO web site URL is:

http://home.san.rr.com/doguimont/uploads

[ANS thanks Dave Guimont, WB6LLO, for this information]

OSCAR 10 AO-10
Uplink    435.030 to 435.180 MHz CW/LSB
Downlink 145.975 to 145.825 MHz CW/USB
Beacon  145.810 MHz (unmodulated carrier)
Launched: June 16, 1983 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Semi-operational

AO-10 has been locked into a Mode-B, 70-cm uplink and
2-meter downlink for several years.

Don, KD4APP, reports that he has been able to hear the beacon
recently.

W4SM has more information about the satellite at the following URL:

http://www.cstone.net/~w4sm/AO-10.html

[ANS thanks Stacey Mills, W4SM, for his AO-10 status information
and web site]

AMRAD AO-27
Uplink               145.850 MHz FM
Downlink           436.795 MHz FM
Launched: September 26, 1993 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Semi-operational, mode J.

The latest information on AO-27 indicates it is back on the air. AO-27
control operator Michael Wyrick, N3UC (former N4USI), had earlier
reported AO-27 has been turned off to condition the batteries.

More information is available at:

www.ao27.org

An AO-27 question-and-answer page is available on the AMSAT-NA web
site, with updates by Ray, W2RS. The URL is:

http://www.amsat.org/amsat/intro/ao27faq.html

AO-27 uses a method called Timed Eclipse Power Regulation (TEPR) to
regulate the on-board batteries. In simple terms, TEPR times how long
the satellite has been in an eclipse (or in the sun) and decides what
subsystems to turn on or off. The AO-27 pages on the AMSAT-NA web
site include an explanation of TEPR AO-27 operations (at):

http://www.amsat.org/amsat/sats/n7hpr/ao27.html

On Saturday, March 30, 2002, the TEPR states on AO-27 were
reset as follows:  TEPR 4 - 50
TEPR 5 - 90

[ANS thanks AMRAD for AO-27 information]

UO-14
Uplink               145.975 MHz FM
Downlink           435.070 MHz FM
Launched: January 22, 1990 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Operational, mode J

Tim, KG8OC, features UO-14 information on the Michigan AMSAT
web site - point your web browser to the following URL:

http://www.qsl.net/kg8oc

Ray, W2RS, has revised the AO-27 FAQ on < www.amsat.org > to
include information on UO-14.

[ANS thanks Chris Jackson, G7UPN/ZL2TPO, for UO-14 information]

SO-41  SAUDISAT-1A
Uplink      145.850 MHz
Downlink           436.775 MHz
Broadcast Callsign         SASAT1-11
BBS                                SASAT1-12
Launched: September 26, 2000 aboard a converted Soviet ballistic
missile from the Baikonur Cosmodrome.
Status: operational

One of two ham satellites from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia built by
the Space Research Institute at the King Abdulaziz City for Science and
Technology.

The spacecraft is operating in Mode-J, currently configured as an
analog FM voice repeater. The spacecraft will operate in this mode
intermittently, as power and spacecraft experiments permit.

SO-41's downlink RF power is 1-watt with left-hand circular polarization.
The uplink antenna (located on top of the spacecraft) is linear in
polarization.

[ANS thanks Turki Al-Saud for this information]

JAS-1b FO-20
Uplink               145.90 to 146.00 MHz CW/LSB
Downlink           435.80 to 435.90 MHz CW/USB
Launched: February 07, 1990 by an H1 launcher from the Tanegashima
Space Center in Japan.
Status: Operational. FO-20 is in mode JA continuously

Tak, JA2PKI, reported FO-20 control station operators believe that the
UVC (Under Voltage Controller) now is regulating the transponder. The
controller monitors battery voltage and tries to protect the batteries from
over discharge.

[ANS thanks Kazu Sakamoto, JJ1WTK, for the FO-20 status reports]

JAS-2 FO-29
Launched: August 17, 1996, by an H-2 launcher from the Tanegashima
Space Center in Japan. Status: Operational

Voice/CW Mode JA
Uplink    145.90 to 146.00 MHz CW/LSB
Downlink           435.80 to 435.90 MHz CW/USB

Digital Mode JD
Uplink               145.850 145.870 145.910 MHz FM
Downlink           435.910 MHz 1200-baud BPSK or 9600-baud FSK
Callsign             8J1JCS
Digitalker           435.910 MHz

Last reported, the JARL FO-29 command station announced the
operation schedule of FO-29 as mode JA through June 30, 2002.

Mineo, JE9PEL, has a FO-29 satellite telemetry analysis program that
will automatically analyze all digital telemetry from the satellite (such as
current, voltage and temperature). The JE9PEL FO-29/shareware is
available at the following URL:

http://www.ne.jp/asahi/hamradio/je9pel/

[ANS thanks Kazu Sakamoto, JJ1WTK, for the FO-29 status reports]

/EX

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-146.04
WEEKLY SATELLITE REPORT PART 2

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE BULLETIN 146.04 FROM AMSAT HQ
SILVER SPRING, MD, MAY 26, 2002
TO ALL RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-146.04

SAPPHIRE NO-45
Downlink 437.095 MHz 1200 baud AX-25 AFSK
Uplink  145.945 MHz UI Digipeater
Launched: September 30, 2001 aboard an Athena-1 rocket from the
Kodiak, Alaska launch complex. Status: Operational

Student built Sapphire was launched through the U.S. Naval
Academy Satellite program. Its primary missions are sensor
experiments, a camera, and voice synthesizer. For more information,
visit the Sapphire web site at:

http://students.cec.wustl.edu/~sapphire/sapphire_overview.html

[ANS thanks Bob Bruninga, WB4APR, for PCSat information]

PCSAT NO-44
Uplink/downlink    145.827 MHz 1200 baud AX-25 AFSK via PCSAT-1
Aux/Uplink            435.250 MHz 9600 baud via PCSAT-2 (off)
APRS Downlink    144.390 MHz (Region 2)
Launched: September 30, 2001 aboard an Athena-1 rocket from the
Kodiak, Alaska launch complex. Status: Operational

WB4APR reports PCSat "appears to be in great shape even though it
has now entered another maximum eclipse period for about a month.
The only restriction at this time is that we ask for no unattended
overnight beacons during May."  Control operators added a new
operating mode to PCSat that resulted in its packet callsign changing.
The new callsign "NODIGI" will be used when the digipeater is off. All
other calls remain the same.

PCSat is a 1200-baud APRS digipeater designed for use by
stations using hand-held or mobile transceivers. Downlinks feed a
central web site < http://pcsat.aprs.org >. The APRS-equipped
PCSat was built by midshipmen from the U.S. Naval Academy
under the guidance of Bob Bruninga, WB4APR.

A new version of PCSAT.EXE has been posted at:

ftp://tapr.org/dosstuff/APRSdos/pcsat017.zip

For more information, visit the PCSat web site at:

http://web.usna.navy.mil/~bruninga/pcsat.html

[ANS thanks Bob Bruninga, WB4APR, for PCSat information]

TIUNGSAT-1 MO-46
Uplink               145.850 or 145.925 MHz 9600-baud FSK
Downlink           437.325 MHz
Broadcast callsign   MYSAT3-11
BBS                         MYSAT3-12

Launched: September 26, 2000 aboard a converted Soviet ballistic
missile from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Status: Operational at
38k4-baud FSK

TiungSat-1 is Malaysia's first micro-satellite and in addition to
commercial land and weather imaging payloads offers FM and FSK
Amateur Radio communication.

TiungSat-1, named after the mynah bird of Malaysia, was developed as
a collaborative effort between the Malaysian government and Surrey
Satellite Technology Ltd.

[ANS thanks Chris Jackson, G7UPN/ZL2TPO, for this information]

UOSAT UO-22
Uplink               145.900 FM 9600-baud FSK
Downlink           435.120 MHz FM
Broadcast Callsign UOSAT5-11
BBS                              UOSAT5-12
Launched: July 17, 1991 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Operational

Jim, AA7KC, reports UO-22 is operational with a downlink efficiency
near 100%.

More information on the satellite is available at the following URL:

http://www.sstl.co.uk/

[ANS thanks Chris Jackson, G7UPN/ZL2TPO, for UO-22 information
and Jim Weisenberger, AA7KC, for status information]

OSCAR-11
Downlink              145.825 MHz FM (1200-baud AFSK)
Mode-S Beacon    2401.500 MHz
Launched: March 1, 1984 by a Delta-Thor rocket from Vandenberg Air
Force Base in California. Status: Operational

During the period of April 8-17, 2002 consistent signals have been
received from the 145.826 MHz beacon. However, some interference
has been experienced on the channel. The internal temperatures have
decreased by two degrees C - now 2.0C and -0.2C for battery and
telemetry electronics respectively. The battery voltage observed during
daylight passes has decreased by 0.2 volts. The average value observed
was 13.4 volts, with a range of 13.0 to 13.8 volts. The rate of the SEU
counter has increased from 932 to 1150 counts per day. The WOD
survey of channels 10, 20, 30, 40 has been transmitted. The spin period
has increased from 295 to 697 seconds. The attitude is controlled solely
by the gravity boom gradient.

The operating schedule is unchanged.

ASCII status (210 seconds)
ASCII bulletin (60 seconds)
BINARY SEU (30 seconds)
ASCII TLM (90 seconds)
ASCII WOD (120 seconds)
ASCII bulletin (60 seconds)
BINARY ENG (30 seconds)

The ASCII bulletin is currently a static message, detailing modes and
frequencies of all active Amateur Radio satellites.

More information on OSCAR-11 is available at the following URL:

http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/clivew/

[ANS thanks Clive Wallis, G3CWV, for OSCAR-11 status information]

PACSAT AO-16
Uplink                           145.90 145.92 145.94 145.96 MHz FM
                                     (using 1200-baud Manchester FSK)
Downlink                       437.025 MHz SSB (RC-BPSK 1200-baud PSK)
Mode-S Beacon            2401.1428 MHz
Broadcast Callsign:       PACSAT-11
BBS                               PACSAT-12
Launched: January 22, 1990 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Semi-operational, the digipeater command is on.

Telemetry (state of the batteries at the end of a dark orbit) is as follows:

Uptime is 826/17:09:18. Time is Sun May 19 20:54:41 2002
+10V Bus 10.050 V  +Z Array V 0.102 V
Rx Temp -9.078 D  +X (RX) temp 3.629 D
Bat 1 V 1.218 V  Bat 2 V 1.145 V
Bat 3 V 1.170 V  Bat 4 V 1.234 V
Bat 5 V 1.204 V  Bat 6 V 1.194 V
Bat 7 V 1.190 V  Bat 8 V 1.223 V
Bat 1 Temp 4.839 D  Bat 2 Temp 5.444 D
Baseplt Temp 4.839 D  PSK TX RF Out 0.781 W
PSK TX HPA Tmp -4.842 D  +Y Array Temp -5.448 D
RC PSK HPA Tmp -24.811 D  RC PSK BP Temp -1.212 D
+Z Array Temp -13.919 D
IAry= 0.000 IBatCh=-0.320 Ifb= 0.161 I+10V= 0.159
TX:1006 BCR:78 PWRC:36D BT:1E WC:25 EDAC:92

A WOD collection of current graphics along with general information
and telemetry samples can be found at:

www.telecable.es/personales/ea1bcu

[ANS thanks Miguel Menendez, EA1BCU, for AO-16 status information]

ITAMSAT IO-26
Uplink               145.875 145.900 145.925 145.950 MHz FM (1200-baud)
Downlink           435.822 MHz SSB
Broadcast Callsign         ITMSAT-11
BBS                                ITMSAT-12
Launched: September 26, 1993 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Semi-operational, the digipeater function is on
and open for APRS users.

[ANS thanks ITAMSAT Project Manager Alberto E. Zagni, I2KBD, for
IO-26 information]

/EX

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-146.05
WEEKLY SATELLITE REPORT PART 3

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE BULLETIN 146.05 FROM AMSAT HQ
SILVER SPRING, MD, MAY 26, 2002
TO ALL RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-146.05

THE FOLLOWING ARE IN ORBIT BUT ARE NON-OPERATIONAL
OR SEMI-OPERATIONAL AT THIS TIME:

KITSAT KO-23
Uplink               145.900 MHz FM (9600-baud FSK)
Downlink           435.170 MHz FM
Broadcast Callsign         HLO1-11
BBS                                HLO1-12
Launched: August 10, 1992 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Non-operational.

Jim, AA7KC, reports that KO-23's downlink transmitter continues in a
non-operational status.

[ANS thanks Jim Weisenberger, AA7KC, and KyungHee Kim, HL0ENJ,
for KO-23 status information]

KITSAT KO-25
Uplink               145.980 MHz FM (9600-baud FSK)
Downlink           436.500 MHz FM
Broadcast Callsign   HL02-11
BBS                          HL02-12
Launched: September 26, 1993 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Semi-operational

Jim, AA7KC, reports KO-25 is essentially non-operational due to very
low downlink efficiencies. Jim reports there have been a few contacts
displayed on the satellite, but downlink efficiency continues to be poor.
Robert, G8ATE, reports he was able to hear KO-25 recently but was
unable to decode any telemetry due to weak downlink.

[ANS thanks Jim Weisenberger, AA7KC, for this information]

UoSAT-12 UO-36
Uplink               145.960 MHz (9600-baud FSK)
Downlink           437.025 MHz 437.400 MHz
Broadcast Callsign         UO121-11
BBS                                UO121-12
Launched: April 21, 1999 by a Russian launcher from the Baikonur
Cosmodrome. Status: Unknown

UO-36 carries a number of imaging payloads, digital store-and-forward
communications and mode L/S transponders.

Paul, KB2SHU, tells ANS that UO-36 has not been operational (over
North America) since late July 2001. In addition, Sangat, 9M2SS,
reports he has not copied UO-36 since July 30, 2001.

The VK5HI viewer shareware for UO-36 is available on the AMSAT-NA
web site at the following URL:

ftp://ftp.amsat.org/amsat/software/win32/display/ccddsp97-119.zip

Further information on UO-36 is available from: http://www.sstl.co.uk/

[ANS thanks Chris G7UPN/ZL2TPO, and the University of Surrey for
UO-36 information]

TMSAT-1 TO-31
Uplink               145.925 MHz (9600-baud FSK)
Downlink           436.925 MHz (9600-baud FSK)
Broadcast Callsign:        TMSAT1-11
BBS                                TMSAT1-12
Launched: July 10, 1998 by a Zenit rocket from the Baikonur
Cosmodrome. Status: Non-operational, no data downlinked
since December 18, 2000.

Chris G7UPN, (UoSAT operations manager) reports the
following to ANS:

The TO-31 downlink will be off over most areas, with the exception of
Europe and Thailand.

ProcMail V2.00G has been released by G7UPN. This software permits
the processing of image files from TO-31. It has been posted to the
AMSAT-NA FTP site at the following URL:

http://www.amsat.org/amsat/software/win32/wisp

Many of the high-resolution color images transmitted by TMSAT are
compressed using a UoSAT compression format. This format is
supported by the VK5HI CCD display program.

[ANS thanks Chris Jackson, G7UPN/ZL2TPO, for TO-31 status
information]

LUSAT LO-19
Uplink                           145.84 145.86 145.88 145.90 MHz FM
                                     (using 1200-baud Manchester FSK)
CW downlink                 437.125 MHz
Digital downlink             437.150 MHz SSB (RC-BPSK 1200-baud PSK)
Broadcast Callsign         LUSAT-11
BBS                                LUSAT-12
Launched: January 22, 1990 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou, French
Guiana. Status: Beacon only. The CW beacon is sending eight telemetry
channels and one status channel on 437.126 MHz. No BBS service is
available. The digipeater is not active.

Telemetry is as follows:

Time is Wed May 19 21:01:00 2002

CW-Code: aun ada av4 ade au4 a6u a6v ae6
5V-reg.: 4.93 V   8.5V-reg: 8.74 V
10V-Bat: 11.58 V  10V-Curr: 113.4 mA
TX-Pwr : 0.957 W  TX-Temp.: 0.25 
+Z-Sol.: 24.45 V  Box-Temp: 4.27 

CW-Code: aun ada ave ade aue a6u a6v ae6
5V-reg.: 4.93 V   8.5V-reg: 8.74 V
10V-Bat: 11.58 V  10V-Curr: 113.4 mA
TX-Pwr : 0.957 W  TX-Temp.: -0.11 
+Z-Sol.: 24.45 V  Box-Temp: 3.92 

CW-Code: aun ada av6 ad4 au6 a64 a6v ae6
5V-reg.: 4.93 V   8.5V-reg: 8.74 V
10V-Bat: 11.58 V  10V-Curr: 114.8 mA
TX-Pwr : 0.947 W  TX-Temp.: -0.46 
+Z-Sol.: 24.45 V  Box-Temp: 3.56 

General information and telemetry samples can be found at:

www.telecable.es/personales/ea1bcu

[ANS thanks Miguel Menendez, EA1BCU, for LO-19 status information]

SO-42  SAUDISAT-1B
Uplink                to be released
Downlink           436.075 MHz
Broadcast Callsign         SASAT2-11
BBS                                SASAT2-12
Launched: September 26, 2000 aboard a converted Soviet ballistic
missile from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Status: Unknown, ANS has
received no additional information.

When/if operational, SaudiSat-1B will operate as 9600-baud digital
store-and-forward systems as well analog FM repeater mode capability.
One of two new ham satellites from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia built by
the Space Research Institute at the King Abdulaziz City for Science and
Technology.

SUNSAT SO-35
Launched: February 23, 1999 by a Delta II rocket from Vandenberg Air
Force Base in California. Status: Non-operational

The SunSat team released the following statement, dated
February 1, 2001:

We regret to announce that the last communication with SunSat from our
ground station at the Electronic Systems Laboratory at Stellenbosch
University took place recently. We are certain, after having performed
several tests since the last contact, that an irreversible, physical failure
has occurred on the satellite. It is therefore unlikely that we will have
any further contact with SunSat, apart from the occasional visual sighting
by telescope!

When it was operational the SunSat package included 1200 and 9600
baud digital store-and-forward capability and a voice 'parrot' repeater
system in addition to Mode B/J operation with two VHF and two UHF
transmit-receive systems.

For more information on SunSat visit the following URL:

http://sunsat.ee.sun.ac.za

[ANS thanks Garth Milne, ZR1AFH, for this information]

TECHSAT-1B GO-32
Downlink           435.225 MHz using HDLC telemetry
Launched: July 10, 1998 by a Russian Zenit rocket from the Baikonur
Cosmodrome. Status: Semi-operational.

Last reported, the satellite does transmit a 9600-baud burst every 30
seconds (the GO-32 beacon sends one short telemetry status
transmission of 44 bytes) and upon request the complete telemetry
buffer.

[ANS has no further information]

PANSAT PO-34
Uplink/downlink frequency (listed on the PanSat web site) 436.500 MHz
Launched: October 30, 1998 by the Shuttle Discovery. Status: Unknown

The satellite is not available for general uplink transmissions.

The Naval Postgraduate School developed PanSat. At the time of
launch, PanSat spread-spectrum digital transponders were to
be available to Amateur Radio operators along with software to utilize
this technology.

The satellite is still operating, however, the spread spectrum packet radio
portion never took place. The spacecraft is now beyond it's initial 2-year
mission life, but telemetry records are still being downloaded.

For more information, visit the official PanSat web site at:

http://www.sp.nps.navy.mil/pansat/

PanSat was the featured cover article on the July/August 1999 issue of
the AMSAT-NA Journal (the story written by KD6DRA and N7HPR).

[ANS has no further information]

DOVE DO-17
Downlink           145.825 MHz FM (1200-baud AFSK)
                          2401.220 MHz
Launched: January 22, 1990 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Non-operational.

DOVE stopped transmitting in March 1998. The 145.825 MHz and
2401.220 MHz downlinks are off the air and the satellite has not
responded to ground station control.

[ANS has no further information]

WEBERSAT WO-18
Downlink           437.104 MHz SSB (1200 baud PSK AX.25)
Launched: January 22, 1990 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Non-operational.

WO-18 was last reported to be in MBL mode after a software crash.

[ANS has no further information]

SEDSAT-1 SO-33
Downlink           437.910 MHz FM (9600-baud FSK)
Launched: October 24, 1998 by a Delta 2 rocket from Cape Canaveral,
Florida. Status: Semi-operational.

The satellite is not currently available for uplink transmissions and the
image and transponder recovery efforts have been unsuccessful.

SedSat-1 signifies Students for the Exploration and Development of
Space (satellite number one).

SedSat-1 has downlinked months worth of telemetry data on the
performance of its electrical power system parameters. The Nickel
Metal Hydride batteries on the spacecraft were experimental and
experienced some abuse due to a power negative situation. This
information has provided NASA with useful information. With the
exception of the imaging system and the use of the transponders,
SedSat-1 has been judged a success.

For more information on SedSat-1 visit the satellite web site at the
following URL:

http://seds.uah.edu/projects/sedsat/sedsat.htm

[ANS has no further information]

/EX

ANS is released worldwide via the AMSAT ANS e-mail reflector and a
live radiocast on the AMSAT-NA 20-meter net held each Sunday on
14.282 MHz. Pre-net operations start at 18:00 UTC, with current ANS
bulletins transmitted to the eastern U.S. at 19:00 UTC and to the western
U.S. at 19:30 UTC.

Information on AMSAT-NA is available at the following URL:

http://www.amsat.org <http://www.amsat.org/>  (or from)

AMSAT-NA
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Currently, AMSAT-NA supports the following (free) mailing lists:

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To subscribe, or for more list information, visit the following URL:

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In addition to regular membership, AMSAT-NA offers membership in the
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Initially, there will two levels for donations - Gold and Silver.
Application forms are available from the AMSAT-NA Office.

AMSAT-NA has developed a on-line volunteer survey, designed
to identify the interests and skills of those who may be available to
directly help in efforts to develop the amateur satellite program. The
survey is designed to be completed and returned on-line, and takes
only a few minutes to fill out. To request the survey, simply send an
e-mail request to:

volunteer@amsat.org

ANS is always dedicated to past ANS editor 'BJ' Arts, WT0N, and to the
memory of long-time AMSAT supporters Werner Haas, DJ5KQ, and
Dennis Kitchen, G0FCL.

ANS would like to thank Mike Seguin, N1JEZ, ANS principal satellite
investigator, for helping provide current satellite information.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:

ans-editor@amsat.org

Daniel (Dan) James
AMSAT News Service Bulletin Editor
AMSAT-NA Vice President/Public Affairs
Amateur callsign: NN0DJ
Grid Square EN28iv
Warroad, Minnesota U.S.A.
E-mail: nn0dj@amsat.org

/EX


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