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[jamsat-news:1622] ANS 320


AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS 320

ANS is a free, weekly, news and information service of AMSAT North
America, the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation. ANS reports on the
activities of a worldwide group of Amateur Radio operators who share an
active interest in designing, building, launching and communicating
through analog and digital Amateur Radio satellites.

This edition of ANS is dedicated to the memory of Hartley Alley, NA0A,
who died recently in Boulder, Colorado at age 82. NA0A was known for
starting the bicycle mobile ham radio association. The BMHA now has
more than 500 members. [ANS thanks the ARRL for this information]

ANS salutes Danny Weil, VP2VB, who popularized DXpeditioning
many years ago. VP2VB is among the inaugural group of 50 inductees
into the CQ Amateur Radio Hall of Fame. [ANS thanks CQ Amateur
Radio magazine, published by CQ Communications, Inc. for this
information]

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-320.01
AO-40 UPDATE

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE BULLETIN 320.01 FROM AMSAT HQ
SILVER SPRING, MD, NOVEMBER 16, 2001
TO ALL RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-320.01

AO-40 celebrates one year in space!

The Phase 3D satellite was launched on November 16, 2000 aboard an
Ariane 5 launcher from Kourou, French Guiana.

Transponder operation started on May 05, 2001 when the U-band and
L1-band uplinks were connected to the S-2 transmitter passband
downlink via the Matrix switch.

Congratulations to the entire AO-40 team!

Bob, WB4APR, has been working on a portable reflector system,
following the pioneering work of G6LVB. Bob has been working on a
1-meter suitcase portable system. Check out the construction at:

http://web.usna.navy.mil/~bruninga/ao40ant.html.

AO-40 is currently in a long period during which the Earth eclipses
the Sun near perigee. These actually began about August 28th, and
will rapidly increase in length. The will continue well into June 2002.

For the current transponder operating schedule visit:

http://www.amsat-dl.org/journal/adlj-p3d.htm

Stay tuned to ANS, the official source of AO-40 information.

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA for this information]

/EX

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-320.02
ISS UPDATE

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE BULLETIN 320.02 FROM AMSAT HQ
SILVER SPRING, MD, NOVEMBER 16, 2001
TO ALL RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-320.02

Expedition-3 Commander Frank Culbertson and Pilot Vladimir Dezhurov
completed the external outfitting of the PIRS docking compartment on
the International Space Station recently, conducting a 5 hour spacewalk
outside the orbital outpost.

Flight Engineer Mikhail Tyurin, who conducted two previous spacewalks
in October, monitored the activities from inside the ISS and operated the
Canadarm2 robotic arm, providing television views for flight controllers in
Houston and Moscow.

Science work aboard the station has resumed this week.

ISS will have a new set of Amateur Radio antennas soon. The antennas
are expected to be transported to ISS shortly and installed around
the perimeter of the Service Module, allowing future operation from HF to
microwave frequencies. The HF antenna is made up of a flexible tape
that will work on 10-meters (along with possibility 15 and 20-meters).

Miles, WF1F, has posted pictures of the new antenna system on the
web at:

http://www.marex-na.org/fileshtml/galleryantenna.html

With systems operating normally, the station is orbiting at an average
altitude of 247 statute miles. For additional information on station
activities, including sighting opportunities from anywhere on the Earth,
visit the web at:
 
http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/

[ANS thanks NASA for this information]

/EX

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-320.03
ANS IN BRIEF

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE BULLETIN 320.03 FROM AMSAT HQ
SILVER SPRING, MD, NOVEMBER 16, 2001
TO ALL RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-320.03

ANS news in brief this week includes the following:

** AMSAT-NA's VP of Human Spaceflight Programs Frank Bauer,
KA3HDO, participated in a public interest radio program (along with
Bob Bruninga, WB4APR) on NPR's WAMU radio station. The session
was carried on 33 NPR stations throughout the U.S. Frank talked
about satellite operation, centered on the ARISS program. "I really
enjoyed the opportunity to share our tremendous hobby with
the rest of the world," said KA3HDO. The lively, informative segment
was complemented by a series of callers - most of them also Amateur
Radio licensees - who offered additional insights into ham radio or
wanted to share a story. For those who did not hear the program, you
can go to the WAMU Public Interest web site and hear the program on
Real Audio. Point your browser to the following URL:
http://www.wamu.org/pi/index.html. -ANS/ARRL

** In the DX department, OM5CM (Slovak Republic) has been active
on AO-10. ZS2ACP (South Africa) also created weekend pile-ups on
AO-40, operating when both Europe and North America were in his
window. -Jerry, K5OE

** Jon, N0JK, will be operating HC8N on the FO-20/29, UO-14 and
AO-10 from November 20-26th. The primary purpose of this trip is
operating the CQ-WW CW Contest. Pictures of May 2001 HC8N
satellite operations are at: http://communities.msn.com/6mdx.
-Jon, N0JK

** Scientists in the Netherlands in cooperation with ESA are tracking an
ozone mini-hole opening over the North Atlantic, heading for Europe.
The scientists predict that the mini hole will see ozone levels fall to
60-70% of the seasonal average as it sweeps from Greenland to
southern Scandinavia. Using real time processing of data from the
ERS-2 satellite, the scientists are able to monitor the loss of ozone in
the atmosphere, and watch the hole as it moves. -ESA

** The 2001 AMSAT Field Day Competition results show W9REG
in 12th place, XE2AT in 13th, W8MRM in 14th, K5ENG in 15th and
K4RS in 16th place. Congratulations all! -Andy, W5ACM

** The Dayton Amateur Radio Association has opened the nominating
period for the 2002 Dayton Hamvention Awards. There are three awards
presented each year; Radio Amateur of the Year, Special Achievement
and Technical Excellence. Awards are decided by the committee, based
partially upon the information received. Nominations can be submitted to
Box 964, Dayton Ohio 45401. -DARA

** Early in 2002 an Ariane-5 rocket will launch the largest and most
advanced Earth observation satellite ever built in Europe from the
spaceport at Kourou, French Guiana. The ENVISAT satellite will deliver
images and data that will help better understand and more effectively
protect the Earth. -ESA

** 2001 AMSAT Symposium awards included a presentation to Diana
Diggs, in grateful appreciation for her work as Outside Activities
Coordinator for the 2001 AMSAT Annual Meeting and Space Symposium.
Her dedicated service and hard work in handling the myriad details
associated with this important aspect of our annual gathering was noted
with thanks. -AMSAT-NA

** The FCC assigned a rulemaking number to the petition in which
Kenwood asks the government to permit control methods like its
own Sky Command radio remote system. Kenwood's Sky Command
lets a user control a fixed location HF station using a pair of dual-band
VHF/UHF transceivers. A change in Part 97 rules would expand
permission to operate an auxiliary station on all 2-meter frequencies
above 144.5 MHz. -ARNewsLine

** A symbol of American technological prowess, NASA's shuttle
Endeavour stands poised on a Kennedy Space Center launch pad, a
potential target for a terrorist attack. But the seven astronauts and
cosmonauts destined to launch aboard the ship say they'll be fearless
fliers when Endeavour blasts off for the International Space Station
later this month. -NASA

--ANS BULLETIN END---

/EX

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-320.04
WEEKLY SATELLITE REPORT PART 1

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE BULLETIN 320.04 FROM AMSAT HQ
SILVER SPRING, MD, NOVEMBER 16, 2001
TO ALL RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-320.04

Phase 3D / AMSAT OSCAR 40 / AO-40
Launched: November 16, 2000 aboard an Ariane 5 launcher
from Kourou, French Guiana. 
Status: Currently, the U/L-1 to S-2 passband is active.
Uplink    	U-band    435.550 - 435.800 MHz CW/SSB
                  	L1-band  1269.250 - 1269.500 MHz CW/SSB
                  	L2-band  1268.325 - 1268.575 MHz CW/SSB
Downlink  	2401.225 - 2401.475 MHz CW/SSB

For the current transponder operating schedule visit:

http://www.amsat-dl.org/journal/adlj-p3d.htm

Happy birthday AO-40, celebrating 1-year in space!

AO-40 experimental transponder operation started on May 05, 2001 at
approximately 08:00 UTC when the U-band and L1-band uplinks were
connected to the S-2 transmitter passband downlink via the Matrix
switch.

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA, AMSAT-DL and the ARRL for this information]

INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION/ARISS
Worldwide packet uplink:  145.990 MHz
Region 1 voice uplink:       145.200 MHz
Region 2/3 voice uplink:    144.490 MHz
Worldwide downlink:          145.800 MHz
TNC callsign                       NOCALL

ARISS initial station launched September 2000 aboard shuttle Atlantis.
ARISS is made up of delegates from major national Amateur Radio
organizations, including AMSAT.

Status: Operational.

Ten students at Phillips Middle School in Chapel Hill, North Carolina,
made a radio visit recently to ISS, bringing the reality of space
exploration
into the classroom. Barbara, KE4JZM, served as coordinating teacher and
radio operator for the event, arranged through the ARISS program.

The ISS packet station (normally) available for UI packets. The mailbox
and keyboard are currently disabled. Please see the packet section of
the ARISS web page before attempting to first work ISS on packet.

The ISS daily crew schedule (which gives an idea when crew members
have free time and may be available for Amateur Radio operations) can
be found at:

http://spaceflight.nasa.gov/station/timelines/2001/may/index.html

U.S. callsign:                  NA1SS
Russian callsigns:          RS0ISS, RZ3DZR

The QSL routes for W/VE stations working NA1SS aboard the
International Space Station:

U.S. stations (a SASE is required to get a QSL in return):
Margie Bourgoin, KC1DCO
Attn: ARISS Expedition-1 (or 2, 3) QSL
ARRL, 225 Main Street
Newington, Connecticut 06111

Canadian stations:
Radio Amateurs of Canada
Attn: ARISS Expedition-1 (or 2, 3) QSL
720 Belfast Road, Suite 217
Ottawa, Ontario KEG 0Z5

European stations (a SASE and 2 IRC's are required to get
                               a QSL in return.
AMSAT-France
14 bis, rue des Gourlis
92500 Rueil Malmaison
France

[ANS thanks Will Marchant, KC6ROL, and Jean-Louis Rault, F6AGR,
for this information]

RADIO SPORT RS-12
Uplink                           145.910 to 145.950 MHz CW/SSB
Downlink                       29.410 to 29.450 MHz CW/SSB
Beacon                         29.408 MHz
Launched: February 5, 1991 aboard a Russian Cosmos C launcher
Status: RS-12 was re-activated in mode-A on January 1, 2001

The latest information on RS-12 and RS-13 can be found on the AC5DK
RS-12/13 Satellite Operators page at:

http://www.qsl.net/ac5dk/rs1213/rs1213.html

[ANS thanks Kevin Manzer, AC5DK, for RS-12 information]

RADIO SPORT RS-15
Uplink                           145.858 to 145.898 MHz CW/SSB
Downlink                       29.354 to 29.394 MHz CW/SSB
Beacon                         29.352 MHz (intermittent)
SSB meeting frequency     29.380 MHz (unofficial)
Launched: December 26, 1994 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome
Status: Semi-operational, mode-A, using a 2-meter uplink and a
10-meter downlink

Dave, WB6LLO, has operating information for both RS-15 on his
web site. In addition to satellite data, antenna information for
mode-A operation is also featured. The WB6LLO web site URL is:

http://home.san.rr.com/doguimont/uploads

[ANS thanks Dave Guimont, WB6LLO, for this information]

OSCAR 10 AO-10
Uplink               435.030 to 435.180 MHz CW/LSB
Downlink           145.975 to 145.825 MHz CW/USB
Beacon             145.810 MHz (unmodulated carrier)
Launched: June 16, 1983 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Semi-operational, mode-B. AO-10 has
been locked into a 70-cm uplink and a 2-meter downlink for several
years.

DX continues to be heard and worked on AO-10 with very good
conditions recently. Drew, KO4MA, reports working OZ1MY,
ON4API, ON1AAA, DJ6JJ, and UA3PAB. John, K6YK, worked
TR8CA and 5B4AZ. Jerry, K5OE, reports QSO's with IW9AZJ,
OM3WBC, OE5PAM, DJ7FE, DL1CR, IW4DTP, UR5MGW, SV1OH,
ON1DO, and F6HCC.

W4SM has more information about the satellite at the following URL:

http://www.cstone.net/~w4sm/AO-10.html

[ANS thanks Stacey Mills, W4SM, for his AO-10 status information
and web site]

AMRAD AO-27
Uplink               145.850 MHz FM
Downlink           436.795 MHz FM
Launched: September 26, 1993 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Operational, mode J.

Periodically, AO-27's analog repeater will be turned off for a few days at
a time to enable ground controllers to gather Whole Orbital Data (WOD),
to verify the health of the satellite.

An AO-27 question-and-answer page is available on the AMSAT-NA web
site, with recent updates by Ray, W2RS. The URL is:

http://www.amsat.org/amsat/intro/ao27faq.html

AO-27 uses a method called Timed Eclipse Power Regulation (TEPR) to
regulate the on-board batteries. In simple terms, TEPR times how long
the satellite has been in an eclipse (or in the sun) and decides what
subsystems to turn on or off. The AO-27 pages on the AMSAT-NA web
site include an explanation of TEPR AO-27 operations (at):

http://www.amsat.org/amsat/sats/n7hpr/ao27.html

[ANS thanks AMRAD for AO-27 information]

UO-14
Uplink               145.975 MHz FM
Downlink           435.070 MHz FM
Launched: January 22, 1990 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Operational, mode J

Tim, KG8OC, features UO-14 information on the Michigan AMSAT
web site - point your web browser to the following URL:

http://www.qsl.net/kg8oc

Ray, W2RS, has revised the AO-27 FAQ on < www.amsat.org > to
include information on UO-14.

[ANS thanks Chris Jackson, G7UPN/ZL2TPO, for UO-14 information]

JAS-1b FO-20
Uplink               145.90 to 146.00 MHz CW/LSB
Downlink           435.80 to 435.90 MHz CW/USB
Launched: February 07, 1990 by an H1 launcher from the Tanegashima
Space Center in Japan. Status: Operational. FO-20 is in mode JA
continuously

Tak, JA2PKI, reported FO-20 control station operators believe that the
UVC (Under Voltage Controller) now is regulating the transponder. The
controller monitors battery voltage and tries to protect the batteries from
over discharge.

[ANS thanks Kazu Sakamoto, JJ1WTK, for the FO-20 status reports]

JAS-2 FO-29
Launched: August 17, 1996, by an H-2 launcher from the Tanegashima
Space Center in Japan. Status: Operational

Voice/CW Mode JA
Uplink  		145.90 to 146.00 MHz CW/LSB
Downlink           435.80 to 435.90 MHz CW/USB

Digital Mode JD
Uplink               145.850 145.870 145.910 MHz FM
Downlink           435.910 MHz 1200-baud BPSK or 9600-baud FSK
Callsign             8J1JCS
Digitalker           435.910 MHz

Last reported, the JARL FO-29 command station announced the
operation schedule of FO-29 through December 3, 2001 - is
mode JA

Mineo, JE9PEL, has a FO-29 satellite telemetry analysis program that
will automatically analyze all digital telemetry from the satellite (such as
current, voltage and temperature). The JE9PEL FO-29/shareware is
available at the following URL:

http://www.ne.jp/asahi/hamradio/je9pel/

[ANS thanks Kazu Sakamoto, JJ1WTK, for the FO-29 status reports]

/EX

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-320.05
WEEKLY SATELLITE REPORT PART 2

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE BULLETIN 320.05 FROM AMSAT HQ
SILVER SPRING, MD, NOVEMBER 16, 2001
TO ALL RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-320.05

PCSat
Uplink/downlink	145.825 MHz 1200 baud AX-25 AFSK via W3ADO-1
Uplink                435.250 MHz 9600 baud via W3ADO-2
APRS Downlink 144.390 MHz (Region 2)
TNC callsign	W3ADO-1/2    on 145.825 MHz
PCSAT-11/12  on 144.390 MHz
Launched: September 30, 2001 aboard an Athena-1 rocket from the
Kodiak Alaska Launch Complex.
Status: Operational

PCSat is in a low power mode. Bob, WB4APR, reports PCSat is in a
higher than average eclipse period. "Cautionary, normal operations
can continue as long as the telemetry is showing 00111111," said
WB4APR. 

To help PCSat through this eclipse period, WB4APR asks that all
routine operations cease after 23:00 (users) local time and not resume
until daylight - and that evening transmission rates be further cut in
half from daytime settings. 

The APRS-equipped PCSat was built by midshipmen from the U.S.
Naval Academy under the guidance of Bob Bruninga, WB4APR.
PCSat is a 1200-baud APRS digipeater designed for use by stations
using 1200-baud hand-held transceivers or 9600-baud mobiles.
Downlinks feed a central web site < http://pcsat.aprs.org >.
For more information, visit the PCSat web site at:

http://web.usna.navy.mil/~bruninga/pcsat.html

[ANS thanks Bob Bruninga, WB4APR, for PCSat information]

TIUNGSAT-1
Uplink               145.850 or 145.925 MHz 9600-baud FSK
Downlink           437.325 MHz
Broadcast callsign  	MYSAT3-11
BBS                        	MYSAT3-12

Launched: September 26, 2000 aboard a converted Soviet ballistic
missile from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Status: Operational at
38k4-baud FSK

Chris, G7UPN, tells ANS that TiungSat-1 has been operating at a data
rate of 38k4. Data recovery at 38k4 is reported to be extremely good with
efficiencies near 100%. The output power is at 8-watts "which should
provide a very good downlink," said Chris, adding "the downside is that
with the high power transmitter operating, the power budget is negative
so we can't support continuous operation."

According to G7UPN, TiungSat-1 now requires the Amateur Radio
station to switch the downlink 'on' when the satellite comes into range.
The way this works is for the ground station software to send a request
to the spacecraft to switch the downlink on. The spacecraft receives this
request and checks the battery voltage to see if it can support the
operation, and if it can it will activate the downlink.

TiungSat-1 is Malaysia's first micro-satellite and in addition to
commercial land and weather imaging payloads offers FM and FSK
Amateur Radio communication.

TiungSat-1, named after the mynah bird of Malaysia, was developed as
a collaborative effort between the Malaysian government and Surrey
Satellite Technology Ltd.

[ANS thanks Chris Jackson, G7UPN/ZL2TPO, for this information]

KITSAT KO-25
Uplink               145.980 MHz FM (9600-baud FSK)
Downlink           436.500 MHz FM
Broadcast Callsign  	HL02-11
BBS                         	HL02-12

Launched: September 26, 1993 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Semi-operational

Jim, AA7KC, reports KO-25 is marginally operational with very low
downlink efficiency - in the 3% range. The lack of traffic and low
downlink efficiency indicates a problem. In addition, KO-25's downlink
transmitter power output seems low or intermittent.

[ANS thanks Jim Weisenberger, AA7KC, for this information]

UOSAT UO-22
Uplink               145.900 or 145.975 MHz FM 9600-baud FSK
Downlink           435.120 MHz FM
Broadcast Callsign	UOSAT5-11
BBS                             	UOSAT5-12

Launched: July 17, 1991 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Operational

Jim, AA7KC, reports UO-22 is operational with heavy individual
and SatGate traffic. Downlink efficiency is in the 75% range.

UoSAT command station G7UPN reports to ANS that UO-22 had
been closed for amateur activity for a short duration while command
stations assess the state of the RAM disk. Over the past few weeks
there have been increasing difficulties downloading larger files from
the spacecraft. The store and forward communications system has
been reloaded.

More information on the satellite is available at the following URL:

http://www.sstl.co.uk/

[ANS thanks Chris Jackson, G7UPN/ZL2TPO, for UO-22 information
and Jim Weisenberger, AA7KC, for status information]

OSCAR-11
Downlink              145.825 MHz FM (1200-baud AFSK)
Mode-S Beacon    2401.500 MHz
Launched: March 1, 1984 by a Delta-Thor rocket from Vandenberg Air
Force Base in California. Status: Operational

During the period 15-September to 16-August, consistent signals have
been received from the 145 MHz beacon. The internal temperatures
have continued to increase as the solar eclipse times decrease. A further
rise of 2.5 degree C has been noted. These temperatures are now 5.8C
and 4.0C for battery and telemetry electronics respectively.

The battery voltage observed during daylight passes has increased.
The average value observed was 14.05 with a range of 14.0 to 14.1
volts. The improved battery voltage is also a result of decreasing
solar eclipse times, and this trend is expected to continue for
several months.

Users of OSCAR-11 should note that the hardware generated time in
The ASCII telemetry is now 15.5 minutes ahead of UTC, and the date
is 3 days advanced.

The operating schedule is unchanged.

ASCII status (210 seconds)
ASCII bulletin (60 seconds)
BINARY SEU (30 seconds)
ASCII TLM (90 seconds)
ASCII WOD (120 seconds)
ASCII bulletin (60 seconds)
BINARY ENG (30 seconds)
 
The ASCII bulletin is currently a static message, detailing modes and
frequencies of all active Amateur Radio satellites.

More information on OSCAR-11 is available at the following URL:

http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/clivew/

[ANS thanks Clive Wallis, G3CWV, for OSCAR-11 status information]

PACSAT AO-16
Uplink                           145.90 145.92 145.94 145.96 MHz FM
                                     (using 1200-baud Manchester FSK)
Downlink                       437.025 MHz SSB (RC-BPSK 1200-baud PSK)
Mode-S Beacon            2401.1428 MHz
Broadcast Callsign:       PACSAT-11
BBS                               PACSAT-12

Launched: January 22, 1990 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Semi-operational, the digipeater command is on.

Telemetry is as follows:

uptime is 644/07:58:52.  Time is Sun Nov 18 11:35:56 2001
+10V Bus        10.850 V  	+Z Array V      23.120 V
+X (RX) Temp    -3.632 D  	RX Temp          1.209 D
BCR Input Cur    0.445 A  	BCR Output Cur   0.360 A
Bat 1 Temp       6.049 D  	Bat 2 Temp       6.654 D
Baseplt Temp     7.260 D  	PSK TX RF Out    1.631 W
+Y Array Temp    4.839 D  	PSK TX HPA Tmp   4.839 D
+Z Array Temp   -4.237 D

Total Array C= 0.419 Bat Ch Cur=-0.075 Ifb= 0.026 I+10V= 0.410
TX:1009 BCR:7A PWRC:36D BT:1E WC:25 EDAC:8E

A new WOD collection of current graphics along with general
Information and telemetry samples can be found at:

www.telecable.es/personales/ea1bcu

[ANS thanks Miguel Menendez, EA1BCU, for AO-16 status information]

ITAMSAT IO-26
Uplink               145.875 145.900 145.925 145.950 MHz FM (1200-baud)
Downlink           435.822 MHz SSB
Broadcast Callsign         ITMSAT-11
BBS                                ITMSAT-12

Launched: September 26, 1993 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Semi-operational, the digipeater function is on
and open for APRS users.

[ANS thanks ITAMSAT Project Manager Alberto E. Zagni, I2KBD, for
IO-26 information]

/EX

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-320.06
WEEKLY SATELLITE REPORT PART 3

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE BULLETIN 320.06 FROM AMSAT HQ
SILVER SPRING, MD, NOVEMBER 16, 2001
TO ALL RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-320.06

THE FOLLOWING ARE IN ORBIT BUT ARE NON-OPERATIONAL
AT THIS TIME:

UoSAT-12 UO-36
Uplink               145.960 MHz (9600-baud FSK)
Downlink           437.025 MHz 437.400 MHz
Broadcast Callsign         UO121-11
BBS                                UO121-12

Launched: April 21, 1999 by a Russian launcher from the Baikonur
Cosmodrome. Status: Unknown

UO-36 carries a number of imaging payloads, digital store-and-forward
communications and mode L/S transponders.

Paul, KB2SHU, tells ANS that UO-36 has not been operational (over
North America) since late July. In addition, Sangat, 9M2SS, reports he
has not copied UO-36 since July 30th.

The VK5HI viewer shareware for UO-36 is available on the AMSAT-NA
web site at the following URL:

ftp://ftp.amsat.org/amsat/software/win32/display/ccddsp97-119.zip

Further information on UO-36 is available from: http://www.sstl.co.uk/

[ANS thanks Chris G7UPN/ZL2TPO, and the University of Surrey for
UO-36 information]

TMSAT-1 TO-31
Uplink               145.925 MHz (9600-baud FSK)
Downlink           436.925 MHz (9600-baud FSK)
Broadcast Callsign:        TMSAT1-11
BBS                                TMSAT1-12 

Launched: July 10, 1998 by a Zenit rocket from the Baikonur
Cosmodrome. Status: Non-operational, no data downlinked
since December 18, 2000.

Chris G7UPN, (UoSAT operations manager) reports the
following to ANS:

The TO-31 downlink will be off over most areas, with the exception of
Europe and Thailand. This is required to allow control stations to
recondition the battery with minimum power drain.

ProcMail V2.00G has been released by G7UPN. This software permits
the processing of image files from TO-31. It has been posted to the
AMSAT-NA FTP site at the following URL:

http://www.amsat.org/amsat/software/win32/wisp

Many of the high-resolution color images transmitted by TMSAT are
compressed using a UoSAT compression format. This format is
supported by the VK5HI CCD display program.

[ANS thanks Chris Jackson, G7UPN/ZL2TPO, for TO-31 status
information]

LUSAT LO-19
Uplink                           145.84 145.86 145.88 145.90 MHz FM
                                     (using 1200-baud Manchester FSK)
CW downlink                 437.125 MHz
Digital downlink             437.150 MHz SSB (RC-BPSK 1200-baud PSK)
Broadcast Callsign         LUSAT-11
BBS                                LUSAT-12
Launched: January 22, 1990 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou, French
Guiana. Status: Beacon only. The CW beacon is sending eight telemetry
channels and one status channel on 437.126 MHz. No BBS service is
available. The digipeater is not active.

Telemetry is as follows:

Time is Fri Sep 28 23:02:00 2001
CW-Code: avt abu aun adv aan a6b ttu aee
 5V-reg.:   4.89 V      	8.5V-reg:   	8.68 V
 10V-Bat:  11.01 V      	10V-Curr:  	116.9 mA
 TX-Pwr :  0.938 W      	TX-Temp.:   	2.02 
 +Z-Sol.:   0.30 V      	Box-Temp:   	6.05 

CW-Code: avt abu ava ada auu a66 tta aee
 5V-reg.:   4.89 V      	8.5V-reg:   	8.68 V
 10V-Bat:  11.01 V      	10V-Curr:  	116.2 mA
 TX-Pwr :  0.918 W      	TX-Temp.:   	1.31 
 +Z-Sol.:   0.15 V      	Box-Temp:   	4.98 

CW-Code: avt aba av4 adt au4 a6e ttu aee
 5V-reg.:   4.89 V      	8.5V-reg:   	8.68 V
 10V-Bat:  10.94 V      	10V-Curr:  	115.5 mA
 TX-Pwr :  0.909 W      	TX-Temp.:   	0.25 
 +Z-Sol.:   0.30 V      	Box-Temp:   	4.27 

General information and telemetry samples can be found at:

www.telecable.es/personales/ea1bcu

[ANS thanks Miguel Menendez, EA1BCU, for LO-19 status information]

SO-41  SAUDISAT-1A
Uplink               to be released
Downlink           437.075 MHz 
Broadcast Callsign         SASAT1-11
BBS                                SASAT1-12

Launched: September 26, 2000 aboard a converted Soviet ballistic
missile from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Status: Unknown, this satellite
has been in orbit for almost 8 months. ANS has received no additional
information.

When/if operational, SaudiSat-1A will operate as 9600-baud digital
store-and-forward systems as well analog FM repeater mode capability.
One of two new ham satellites from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia built by
the Space Research Institute at the King Abdulaziz City for Science and
Technology.

SO-42  SAUDISAT-1B
Uplink               to be released
Downlink           436.775 MHz
Broadcast Callsign         SASAT2-11
BBS                                SASAT2-12
Launched: September 26, 2000 aboard a converted Soviet ballistic
missile from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Status: Unknown, this satellite
has been in orbit for almost 8 months. ANS has received no additional
information.

When/if operational, SaudiSat-1B will operate as 9600-baud digital
store-and-forward systems as well analog FM repeater mode capability.
One of two new ham satellites from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia built by
the Space Research Institute at the King Abdulaziz City for Science and
Technology.

SUNSAT SO-35
Mode J Uplink:               145.825 MHz FM
Mode J Downlink:           436.250 MHz FM

Mode B Uplink:               436.291 MHz FM
Mode B Downlink:          145.825 MHz FM

Launched: February 23, 1999 by a Delta II rocket from Vandenberg Air
Force Base in California. Status: Non-operational

The SunSat team released the following statement, dated
February 1, 2001:

We regret to announce that the last communication with SunSat from our
ground station at the Electronic Systems Laboratory at Stellenbosch
University took place recently. We are certain, after having performed
several tests since the last contact, that an irreversible, physical failure
has occurred on the satellite. It is therefore unlikely that we will have
any further contact with SunSat, apart from the occasional visual sighting
by telescope!

When it was operational the SunSat package included 1200 and 9600
baud digital store-and-forward capability and a voice 'parrot' repeater
system in addition to Mode B/J operation with two VHF and two UHF
transmit-receive systems.

For more information on SunSat visit the following URL:

http://sunsat.ee.sun.ac.za 

[ANS thanks Garth Milne, ZR1AFH, for this information]

RADIO SPORT RS-13
Uplink                           21.260 to 21.300 MHz CW/SSB
Downlink                       145.860 to 145.900 MHz CW/SSB
Beacon                         145.860 MHz

Launched: February 5, 1991 aboard a Russian Cosmos C launcher
Status: non-operational (last operational in mode-T)

RS-12 was re-activated in January 2001. Prior to this switch RS-13 was
operational (mode T), but was apparently turned off following the recent
RS-12 switch.

The latest information on RS-12 and RS-13 can be found on the AC5DK
RS-12/13 Satellite Operators page at:

http://www.qsl.net/ac5dk/rs1213/rs1213.html

[ANS thanks Kevin Manzer, AC5DK, for this information]

KITSAT KO-23
Uplink               145.900 MHz FM (9600-baud FSK)
Downlink           435.170 MHz FM
Broadcast Callsign         HLO1-11
BBS                                HLO1-12
Launched: August 10, 1992 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Intermittent operation with the downlink
transmitter operating at unpredictable intervals.

Jim, AA7KC, reported that KO-23's downlink transmitter continues in
non-operational status. Jim says that KO-23 shows some signs of trying
to recover, but no useful data has been downlinked. The duration of this
status is unpredictable. No data has been received since
October 28, 2000.

KyungHee Kim, HL0ENJ, reports (from the KO-23 control team) that part
of the problem with non-operation has been the power budget aboard the
satellite. "We are not sure when the bird might turn off again due to
insufficient power. The capability of the onboard power system has been
less and less," said Kim. HL0ENJ also noted that as of October 30, 2000
the onboard computer was reset and a reboot of operational software
is/was underway.

[ANS thanks Jim Weisenberger, AA7KC, and KyungHee Kim, HL0ENJ,
for KO-23 status information]

TECHSAT-1B GO-32
Downlink           435.225 MHz using HDLC telemetry
Launched: July 10, 1998 by a Russian Zenit rocket from the Baikonur
Cosmodrome. Status: Semi-operational.

Efforts were reported to be underway to bring GO-32 on line, however,
no information has been received by ANS (the last report was dated
November 1999).

Last reported, the satellite does transmit a 9600-baud burst every 30
seconds (the GO-32 beacon sends one short telemetry status
transmission of 44 bytes) and upon request the complete telemetry
buffer.

[ANS has no further information]

PANSAT PO-34
Uplink/downlink frequency (listed on the PanSat web site) 436.500 MHz
Launched: October 30, 1998 by the Shuttle Discovery. Status: Unknown

The satellite is not available for general uplink transmissions.

The Naval Postgraduate School developed PanSat. At the time of
launch, PanSat spread-spectrum digital transponders were to
be available to Amateur Radio operators along with software to utilize
this technology.

For more information, visit the official PanSat web site at:

http://www.sp.nps.navy.mil/pansat/

PanSat was the featured cover article on the July/August 1999 issue of
the AMSAT-NA Journal (the story written by KD6DRA and N7HPR).

[ANS has no further information]

DOVE DO-17
Downlink           145.825 MHz FM (1200-baud AFSK)
                          2401.220 MHz
Launched: January 22, 1990 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Non-operational.

DOVE stopped transmitting in March 1998. The 145.825 MHz and
2401.220 MHz downlinks are off the air and the satellite has not
responded to ground station control.

[ANS has no further information]

WEBERSAT WO-18
Downlink           437.104 MHz SSB (1200 baud PSK AX.25)
Launched: January 22, 1990 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Non-operational.

WO-18 was last reported to be in MBL mode after a software crash.

[ANS has no further information]

SEDSAT-1 SO-33
Downlink           437.910 MHz FM (9600-baud FSK)
Launched: October 24, 1998 by a Delta 2 rocket from Cape Canaveral,
Florida. Status: Semi-operational.

The satellite is not currently available for uplink transmissions and the
image and transponder recovery efforts have been unsuccessful.

SedSat-1 signifies Students for the Exploration and Development of
Space (satellite number one).

SedSat-1 has downlinked months worth of telemetry data on the
performance of its electrical power system parameters. The Nickel
Metal Hydride batteries on the spacecraft were experimental and
experienced some abuse due to a power negative situation. This
information has provided NASA with useful information. With the
exception of the imaging system and the use of the transponders,
SedSat-1 has been judged a success.

For more information on SedSat-1 visit the satellite web site at the
following URL:

http://seds.uah.edu/projects/sedsat/sedsat.htm

[ANS has no further information]

/EX

ANS is released worldwide via the AMSAT ANS e-mail reflector and a
live radiocast on the AMSAT-NA 20-meter net held each Sunday on
14.282 MHz. Pre-net operations start at 18:00 UTC, with current ANS
bulletins transmitted to the eastern U.S. at 19:00 UTC and to the western
U.S. at 19:30 UTC.

Information on AMSAT-NA is available at the following URL:

http://www.amsat.org <http://www.amsat.org/>  (or from)

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Currently, AMSAT-NA supports the following (free) mailing lists:

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In addition to regular membership, AMSAT-NA offers membership in the
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Initially, there will two levels for donations - Gold and Silver.
Application forms are available from the AMSAT-NA Office.

ANS is always dedicated to the memory of past ANS editor 'BJ'
Arts, WT0N, and to the memory of long-time AMSAT supporters
Werner Haas, DJ5KQ, and Dennis Kitchen, G0FCL.

ANS would like to thank Mike Seguin, N1JEZ, ANS principal satellite
investigator, for helping provide current satellite information.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:

ans-editor@amsat.org

Daniel (Dan) James
AMSAT News Service Bulletin Editor
AMSAT-NA Vice President/Public Affairs
Amateur callsign: NN0DJ
Grid Square EN28iv
Warroad, Minnesota U.S.A.
E-mail: nn0dj@amsat.org

/EX

   

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