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[jamsat-news:1433] ANS 042


AMSAT NEWS SERVICE
ANS 042

ANS is a free, weekly, news and information service of AMSAT North
America, the Radio Amateur Satellite Corporation. ANS reports on the
activities of a worldwide group of Amateur Radio operators who share an
active interest in designing, building, launching and communicating
through analog and digital Amateur Radio satellites.

ANS is first released via the AMSAT-NA 20-meter net held each Sunday
on 14.282 MHz. Pre-net operations start at 18:00 UTC, with current ANS
bulletins transmitted to the eastern U.S. at 19:00 UTC and to the western
U.S. at 19:30 UTC. ANS is also released worldwide via the AMSAT ANS
e-mail reflector.

AMSAT-NA is pleased to announce that recent and future developments
in Amateur Radio satellites will take place in Atlanta, Georgia at the
19th Space Symposium and AMSAT-NA Annual Meeting, October 5-6,
2001. 	The Symposium Chairman is Steve Diggs, W4EPI.

Contact W4EPI at:          w4epi@amsat.org

Information on AMSAT-NA is available at the following URL:

http://www.amsat.org (or from)

AMSAT-NA
850 Sligo Avenue, Suite 600
Silver Spring, Maryland
20910-4703

Voice: 301-589-6062
FAX: 301-608-3410

Currently, AMSAT-NA supports the following (free) mailing lists:

* AMSAT News Service (ANS)
* General satellite discussion (AMSAT-BB)
* Orbit data (KEPS)
* Manned space missions (SAREX)
* District of Columbia area (AMSAT-DC)
* New England area (AMSAT-NE)
* AMSAT Educational Liaison mailing list (AMSAT-EDU)
* AMSAT K-12 Educational Liaison mailing list (AMSAT-K12)

A daily digest version is available for each list.

To subscribe, or for more list information, visit the following URL:

http://www.amsat.org/amsat/listserv/menu.html

This edition of ANS is dedicated to the memory of Peter Gellert,
W2WSS, a veteran of the National Traffic System who died recently
at age 74. W2WSS was the manager of the Empire Slow Speed Net
for more than 25 years. [ANS thanks the ARRL for this information]

ANS is always dedicated to the memory of past ANS editor 'BJ' Arts,
WT0N, and to the memory of long-time AMSAT supporter Werner
Haas, DJ5KQ.

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-042.01
PHASE 3D/AO-40 UPDATE

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE BULLETIN 042.01 FROM AMSAT HQ
SILVER SPRING, MD, FEBRUARY 11, 2001
TO ALL RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-042.01

The month of February continues with on-going recovery efforts
of AMSAT OSCAR 40.

The AMSAT-DL web site is currently featuring the following statement:

AMSAT OSCAR 40 is still in its seasonal limitations which will (naturally)
end by April. If the announced de-spinning routine is successful, the
(major) planned recovery efforts of AO-40 could begin earlier. Testing of
this software routine is now underway.

The S-band middle beacon is operating nominally on 2401.323 MHz and
can be heard best between MA-2 and MA-14. The MA numbers will
slightly change due to changing attitude. Eclipses around perigee do not
appear to have a negative influence on the satellite power budget
according to received whole-orbit-data.

This year's AMSAT-DL Symposium will take place very soon and will
have at least three lectures about AO-40:

		* AO-40 Telemetry Reception
		* the AO-40 Launch Campaign and History
		* AO-40 Now and in the Future

AMSAT-DL Journal editor DL6DBN and AMSAT-DL executives DJ4ZC
and DB2OS are scheduled to attend.

ALON/ALAT is currently 248/-7, as last listed on the AMSAT-DL
web page.

The latest orbital parameters are as follows:

Satellite: 		AO-40
Catalog number: 	26609
Epoch time:      		01033.57694040
Element set:      	33
Inclination:        		5.7772 deg
RA of node:       	225.7720 deg
Eccentricity:    		0.8134720
Arg of perigee:   	215.7457 deg
Mean anomaly:      	44.3265 deg
Mean motion:    		1.26935859 rev/day
Decay rate:       		-4.4e-07 rev/day^2
Epoch rev:             	119
Checksum:              	287

The AMSAT-UK web site is also featuring news of AO-40:

AO-40's situation is stable with good battery conditions. If command 
stations are unable to change the attitude then the wait could last until
April before favorable reception conditions return.

Before AO-40's launch, a long period was anticipated before full
commissioning was expected to be completed. It now appears likely
that this waiting period will be actually less than expected. The method
of measuring the Sun angle with solar radiation is not a trivial activity.

There are still strong hopes that the ATOS motor can be used later to
adjust the orbit to something more suitable to general communications.

Although optimism is certainly not a guarantee of future success, AMSAT
continues to believe that there will be successful long-term Amateur Radio
communication through AO-40.

AMSAT-UK wishes the command team the best of luck in their hard work.

Stay tuned to AMSAT News Service, the official source of AO-40 news
and information.

[ANS thanks AMSAT-DL, AMSAT-UK and AMSAT-NA for this
information]

/EX

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-042.02
NEW AMSAT-NA WEB SERVICE

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE BULLETIN 042.02 FROM AMSAT HQ
SILVER SPRING, MD, FEBRUARY 11, 2001
TO ALL RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-042.02

AMSAT-NA Vice President of Electronic Publications, Paul
Williamson, KB5MU, recently informed ANS of a new web
service - messages from the AMSAT-NA bulletin board are now
available on the web!

Indexes by date, thread and author are available. Archives of the
current messages for several convenient periods are also listed, as
are monthly archives (to February 1998). If a satellite operator needs
to unsubscribe from the mailing list for a period, they can then (very
conveniently) review what was missed by browsing the web archives.
Some stations may even find the web archives easier to use than the
mailing list itself!

According to KB5MU, web pages for the SAREX mailing list will be
added soon, followed by web pages for the other AMSAT-NA public
mailing lists.

ANS editor NN0DJ, has used this new service on several
occasions since its inception. Dan finds the new service very easy to
use and extremely beneficial (along with a very easy, user-friendly
web page)!

Need more information? Visit the following URL:

http://www.amsat.org/amsat/archive/amsat-bb/index.html.

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA Vice President of Electronic Publications, Paul
Williamson, KB5MU, for his hard work in putting this new service into
operation]

/EX

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-042.03
ATLANTIS HEADED TO ISS

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE BULLETIN 042.03 FROM AMSAT HQ
SILVER SPRING, MD, FEBRUARY 11, 2001
TO ALL RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-042.03

The space shuttle Atlantis roared into space on Wednesday, February 7,
2001 with a primary objective to deliver and install the U.S. built Destiny
Laboratory - onto the International Space Station.

According to NASA, Destiny is the centerpiece of the station and the site
where unprecedented science experiments will be performed. In
addition, STS-98 astronauts will relocate a pressurized mating adapter
from the Unity Node to Destiny.

While at the station, the astronauts will conduct three space walks and
use Space Shuttle Atlantis' robotic arm.

No Amateur Radio operation is scheduled from the shuttle during this
mission.

[ANS thanks NASA for this information]

/EX

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-042.04
ANS IN BRIEF

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE BULLETIN 042.04 FROM AMSAT HQ
SILVER SPRING, MD, FEBRUARY 11, 2001
TO ALL RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-042.04

ANS news in brief this week includes the following:

** For those interested in crafting an S-band helix antenna, Jerry, K5OE,
suggests taking a look at the one Mike, K9QHO, built from hardware store
parts. It's an AF9Y design with a ring reflector and features a detailed
assembly instruction as well. Check it out at the following URL:
http://members.aol.com/homebrewpics. -Jerry, K5OE

** The charred remnants of a cargo vessel from the Russian space
platform Mir plunged into the Pacific Ocean recently, five days after
detaching itself to make way for a fuel delivery ship, a necessary
step in getting Mir ready for re-entry in March. -SpaceDaily

** As expected, President George Bush picked Michael Powell to
become FCC chairman. Powell, a Republican and a FCC member
since 1997, is the son of Secretary of State Gen. Colin Powell.
Because Powell already sits on the Commission, the nomination
was not subject to Senate confirmation. -ARRL

** The Cassini spacecraft has now successfully rounded Jupiter and
has used a gravity-assist from that world to catapult itself on its way
outward to Saturn -- a voyage of over six and half years (of which it
is now approaching the halfway point). -SpaceDaily

** U.S. amateurs planning to vacation in a foreign country this year
will find it easier to obtain permission to operate there. Amateur Radio
operation from several countries is now a reasonable goal. The
European Conference of Postal and Telecommunications Administration
(CEPT) now requires only three things; a copy of FCC Public Notice
DA 99-2344, proof of  citizenship and the FCC-issued Amateur Radio
license. -ARRL

** Want to find extraterrestrial intelligence? In our Galaxy alone there
are more than 100 billion stars, so where should one look? Bright,
yellow stars like our own Sun have always seemed the obvious place
to start... but researchers have now begun to look at a new class of
likely targets; red dwarfs. -SpaceDaily

--ANS BULLETIN END---

/EX

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-042.05
WEEKLY SATELLITE REPORT PART 1

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE BULLETIN 042.05 FROM AMSAT HQ
SILVER SPRING, MD, FEBRUARY 11, 2001
TO ALL RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-042.05

Phase 3D / AMSAT OSCAR 40 / AO-40
Launched: November 16, 2000 aboard an Ariane 5 launcher
from Kourou, French Guiana. Status: S-Band transmitter is
active, recovery efforts continue.

The V-band, U-band and the L-band (L1) receivers are working on the
the high-gain antennas. The omni-directional antennas appear to be
non-functional. The attitude control system is functional.

[ANS thanks AMSAT-NA and AMSAT-DL for this information]

INTERNATIONAL SPACE STATION/ARISS
Worldwide packet uplink:	145.990 MHz
Region 1 voice uplink:		145.200 MHz
Region 2/3 voice uplink:		144.490 MHz
Worldwide downlink:		145.800 MHz
TNC callsign		RZ3DZR
ARISS initial station launched September 2000 aboard shuttle Atlantis
Status: Operational (although current ISS workload is limiting operation)

Recent school contacts have gone well, the Merivale, Ottawa, Ontario
school contact is currently scheduled for mid-February.

ARISS is made up of delegates from major national Amateur Radio
organizations, including AMSAT.

U.S. callsign: 		NA1SS
Russian callsign:	R0ISS, RZ3DZR
German call sign:	DL0ISS

RZ3DZR-1 is the callsign entered into the TNC currently onboard Alpha,
operation is expected shortly.

More information about the project can be found on the ARISS web site
at http://ariss.gsfc.nasa.gov.

[ANS thanks ARISS team member Will Marchant, KC6ROL, for this
information]

RADIO SPORT RS-12
Uplink 			145.910 to 145.950 MHz CW/SSB
Downlink 		29.410 to 29.450 MHz CW/SSB
Beacon 		29.408 MHz
Launched: February 5, 1991 aboard a Russian Cosmos C launcher
Status: RS-12 was re-activated in mode A on January 1, 2001

Happy birthday RS-12, now 10 years old!

The latest information on RS-12 and RS-13 can be found on the
AC5DK RS-12/13 Satellite Operators page at:

http://www.qsl.net/ac5dk/rs1213/rs1213.html

[ANS thanks Kevin Manzer, AC5DK, for this information]

RADIO SPORT RS-15
Uplink 			145.858 to 145.898 MHz CW/SSB
Downlink 		29.354 to 29.394 MHz CW/SSB
Beacon 		29.352 MHz (intermittent)
SSB meeting frequency     29.380 MHz (unofficial)
Launched: December 26, 1994 from the Baikonur Cosmodrome
Status: Semi-operational, mode-A, using a 2-meter uplink and a
10-meter downlink

Several stations have furnished ANS with recent RS-15 telemetry
information:

System voltage: 	14.8v
Transponder output: 	4/10w
Solar Cells: 		17.6v @ 420mA
Consumption: 		520 mA
10m TX Temp: 		12C
2m RX Temp: 		5C
Stabilizer Temp:		7C

Dave, WB6LLO, has operating information for both RS-15 on his
web site. In addition to satellite data, antenna information for
mode-A operation is also featured. The WB6LLO web site URL is:

http://home.san.rr.com/doguimont/uploads

[ANS thanks Dave Guimont, WB6LLO, for this information]

OSCAR 10 AO-10
Uplink 		435.030 to 435.180 MHz CW/LSB
Downlink 	145.975 to 145.825 MHz CW/USB
Beacon 	145.810 MHz (unmodulated carrier)
Launched: June 16, 1983 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Semi-operational, mode-B. AO-10 has
been locked into a 70-cm uplink and a 2-meter downlink for
several years.

W4SM has more information about the satellite at the following URL:

http://www.cstone.net/~w4sm/AO-10.html

[ANS thanks Stacey Mills, W4SM, for his AO-10 status information
and web site]

AMRAD AO-27
Uplink 		145.850 MHz FM
Downlink 	436.795 MHz FM
Launched: September 26, 1993 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Operational, mode J.

Periodically, AO-27's analog repeater will be turned off for a few days
at a time to enable ground controllers to gather Whole Orbital Data
(WOD), to verify the health of the satellite.

An AO-27 question-and-answer page is available on the AMSAT-NA
web site. The URL is: http://www.amsat.org/amsat/intro/ao27faq.html.

AO-27 uses a method called Timed Eclipse Power Regulation (TEPR)
to regulate the on-board batteries. In simple terms, TEPR times how
long the satellite has been in an eclipse (or in the sun) and decides
what subsystems to turn on or off. The current TEPR settings (as of
November 25, 2000) are:

TEPR 4   18	TEPR 5   36

The AO-27 pages on the AMSAT-NA web site include an
explanation of TEPR AO-27 operations (at):

http://www.amsat.org/amsat/sats/n7hpr/ao27.html

[ANS thanks AMRAD for AO-27 information]

UO-14
Uplink 		145.975 MHz FM
Downlink 	435.070 MHz FM
Launched: January 22, 1990 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Operational, mode J

Tim, KG8OC, has updated the Michigan AMSAT Information site
to include UO-14 information -- point your web browser to the
following URL: 		http://www.qsl.net/kg8oc

[ANS thanks Chris Jackson, G7UPN/ZL2TPO, for UO-14 information]

JAS-1b FO-20
Uplink 		145.90 to 146.00 MHz CW/LSB
Downlink 	435.80 to 435.90 MHz CW/USB
Launched: February 07, 1990 by an H1 launcher from the
Tanegashima Space Center in Japan. Status: Operational.
FO-20 is in mode JA continuously

Happy birthday FO-20, now 11 years old!

Tak, JA2PKI, reported the FO-20 control station operators believe
that the UVC (Under Voltage Controller) now is regulating the
transponder. The UVC monitors battery voltage and tries to protect the
batteries from over discharge.

[ANS thanks Kazu Sakamoto, JJ1WTK, for the FO-20 status reports]

JAS-2 FO-29
Launched: August 17, 1996, by an H-2 launcher from the
Tanegashima Space Center in Japan. Status: Operational

Voice/CW Mode JA
Uplink 		145.90 to 146.00 MHz CW/LSB
Downlink 	435.80 to 435.90 MHz CW/USB

Digital Mode JD
Uplink 		145.850 145.870 145.910 MHz FM
Downlink 	435.910 MHz 1200 baud BPSK or 9600 baud FSK
Callsign		8J1JCS
Digitalker 	435.910 MHz

The JARL FO-29 command station has announced the following
operation schedule of FO-29:

through April 2, 2001  -  	mode JA

Mike, KF4FDJ, has put together a very informative document on FO-29,
addressing the analog, digital and digi-talker modes. To obtain a copy
e-mail Mike at: kf4fdj@amsat.org.

Mineo, JE9PEL, has a FO-29 satellite telemetry analysis program that
will automatically analyze all digital telemetry from the satellite (such as
current, voltage and temperature). The JE9PEL FO-29/shareware is
available at the following URL:

http://www.ne.jp/asahi/hamradio/je9pel/

[ANS thanks Kazu Sakamoto, JJ1WTK, for the FO-29 status reports]

SO-41  SAUDISAT-1A
Uplink		to be released
Downlink    	437.075 MHz 
Broadcast Callsign  	SASAT1-11
BBS             		SASAT1-12
Launched: September 26, 2000 aboard a converted Soviet ballistic
missile from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Status: Commissioning stage,
initial housekeeping tasks underway

SaudiSat-1A will operate as 9600 baud digital store-and-forward
systems as well analog FM repeater mode capability. One of two
new ham satellites from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia built by the
Space Research Institute at the King Abdulaziz City for Science and
Technology.

SO-42  SAUDISAT-1B
Uplink      	to be released
Downlink    	436.775 MHz
Broadcast Callsign  	SASAT2-11
BBS         		SASAT2-12
Launched: September 26, 2000 aboard a converted Soviet ballistic
missile from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Status: Commissioning stage,
initial housekeeping tasks underway

SaudiSat-1B will operate as 9600 baud digital store-and-forward
systems as well analog FM repeater mode capability. One of two
new ham satellites from the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia built by the
Space Research Institute at the King Abdulaziz City for Science and
Technology.

/EX

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-042.06
WEEKLY SATELLITE REPORT PART 2

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE BULLETIN 042.06 FROM AMSAT HQ
SILVER SPRING, MD, FEBRUARY 11, 2001
TO ALL RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-042.06

TIUNGSAT-1
Uplink		145.850  or 145.925 MHz 9600 baud FSK
Downlink	437.325 MHz
Broadcast callsign	MYSAT3-11
BBS			MYSAT3-12
Launched: September 26, 2000 aboard a converted Soviet ballistic
missile from the Baikonur Cosmodrome. Status: Operational at
38k4 baud FSK

Chris, G7UPN, tells ANS that recently TiungSat-1 has been operating
at a data rate of 38k4. Data recovery at 38k4 is reported to be extremely
good with efficiencies near 100%. The output power is at 8-watts "which
should provide a very good downlink," said Chris, adding "the downside
is that with the high power transmitter operating, the power budget is
negative so we can't support continuous operation."

According to G7UPN, TiungSat-1 now requires the Amateur Radio station
to switch the downlink 'on' when the satellite comes into range. The way
this works is for the ground station software to send a request to the
spacecraft to switch the downlink on. The spacecraft receives this request
and checks the battery voltage to see if it can support the operation, and
if
it can it will activate the downlink.

TiungSat-1 is Malaysia's first micro-satellite and in addition to
commercial land and weather imaging payloads offers FM and FSK
Amateur Radio communication.

TiungSat-1, named after the mynah bird of Malaysia, was developed as
a collaborative effort between the Malaysian government and Surrey
Satellite Technology Ltd.

For more information on TiungSat-1, visit the following URL:

http://www.yellowpages.com.my/tiungsat/tiung_main.htm

[ANS thanks Chris Jackson, G7UPN/ZL2TPO, for this information]

KITSAT KO-25
Uplink 		145.980 MHz FM (9600 baud FSK)
Downlink 	436.500 MHz FM
Broadcast Callsign	HL02-11
BBS 			HL02-12
Launched: September 26, 1993 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Operational

Jim, AA7KC, reports KO-25 operational with downlink efficiency
returning to normal. Low operator traffic.

[ANS thanks Jim Weisenberger, AA7KC, for KO-25 status information]

UOSAT UO-22
Uplink 		145.900 or 145.975 MHz FM 9600 baud FSK
Downlink 	435.120 MHz FM
Broadcast Callsign	UOSAT5-11
BBS			UOSAT5-12
Launched: July 17, 1991 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Operational

Jim, AA7KC, reports UO-22 is operational with heavy individual and
Sat-gate traffic.

More information on the satellite is available at the following URL:

http://www.sstl.co.uk/

[ANS thanks Chris Jackson, G7UPN/ZL2TPO, for UO-22 status
information]

OSCAR-11
Downlink 	   145.825 MHz FM (1200 baud AFSK)
Mode-S Beacon    2401.500 MHz
Launched: March 1, 1984 by a Delta-Thor rocket from Vandenberg
Air Force Base in California. Status: Operational

During the period of 16-December 2000 to 16-January, 2001 good
signals have been received from the 145 MHz beacon. OSCAR-11 users
should note that the year displayed in the ASCII status blocks is incorrect.
There is currently a similar error of one year in the date of the latest WOD
survey. Ground control should be able to correct these errors shortly

Battery voltage observed during daylight passes is unchanged. The
average value observed was 14.0, with a range of 13.7 to 14.1 volts.
Internal temperatures have continued to decrease by one degree as the
eclipse periods lengthen. They are now 5.02 and 3.2 C for battery and
telemetry electronics respectively.

The spin period has varied between 256 and 311 seconds. Two positive
magnetorquer correction pulses and zero negative pulses have been
counted, while there have been 324 Z-axis correction pulses.

The operating schedule is as follows:

ASCII status (210 seconds)
ASCII bulletin (60 seconds)
BINARY SEU (30 seconds)
ASCII TLM (90 seconds)
ASCII WOD (120 seconds)
ASCII bulletin (60 seconds)
BINARY ENG (30 seconds)

The ASCII bulletin is currently a static message, detailing modes and
frequencies of all active amateur radio satellites.

More information on OSCAR-11 is available at the following URL:

http://www.users.zetnet.co.uk/clivew/

[ANS thanks Clive Wallis, G3CWV, for OSCAR-11 status information]

LUSAT LO-19
Uplink 		 	145.84 145.86 145.88 145.90 MHz FM
				(using 1200 baud Manchester FSK)
CW downlink 	 	437.125 MHz
Digital downlink  	437.150 MHz SSB (RC-BPSK 1200 baud PSK)
Broadcast Callsign	LUSAT-11
BBS 			LUSAT-12
Launched: January 22, 1990 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Semi-operational. The CW beacon is sending
eight telemetry channels and one status channel on 437.126 MHz. No
BBS service is available. The digipeater is not active.

Frank, DL6DBN / AA9KJ, recently measured the frequency of LO-19's
CW-beacon as 437.126 MHz. Here are Frank's telemetry values as
received:

5V-reg.:   4.93 V     	8.5V-reg:   8.74 V
10V-Bat:  11.01 V     	10V-Curr:  116.9 mA
TX-Pwr :  0.947 W     	TX-Temp.:   2.73 
+Z-Sol.:  21.90 V     	Box-Temp:   6.41 

DL6DBN reported LO-19 signals are solid copied with a small yagi. His
calculated LO-19 values were done with a "quick hack" DOS-software
that Frank has available on his web site:

http://www.dl6dbn.de/amsat/lo-19

Telemetry (limited) is as follows:

Sat Jan 27 at 13:00 2000 UTC
LUSAT HIHI 60 AUN ADT AVT ADE AUU A6E A4E AE6
LUSAT HIHI 60 AUN ADT AVT AD4 AUU A6E A46 AE6

Mineo, JE9PEL, has recorded LO-19 CW and PSK telemetry and
placed the information on his Internet homepage site at:

http://www.ne.jp/asahi/hamradio/je9pel/

General information and telemetry samples can be found at:

www.telecable.es/personales/ea1bcu

[ANS thanks Miguel Menendez, EA1BCU, for LO-19 status information]

PACSAT AO-16
Uplink 			145.90 145.92 145.94 145.96 MHz FM
				(using 1200 baud Manchester FSK)
Downlink		437.025 MHz SSB (RC-BPSK 1200 baud PSK)
Mode-S Beacon   	2401.1428 MHz
Broadcast Callsign:	PACSAT-11
BBS 			PACSAT-12
Launched: January 22, 1990 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Semi-operational, the digipeater command is
on.

Russ, WJ9F, reported the 70-cm transmitter is at about 2-watts output
and WOD is being collected to watch the battery temps to see if they
stabilize to previous levels. S-band transmitter operation is scheduled
to resume the weekend of February 17th.

Telemetry is as follows:

uptime is 356/07:22:15.  Time is Sat Feb 03 10:58:14 2001
+X (RX) Temp     8.470 D  	RX Temp          0.603 D
BCR Load Cur     0.420 A  	BCR Input Cur    0.399 A
BCR Output Cur   0.348 A  	Bat 1 Temp       7.260 D
Bat 2 Temp       7.260 D  	Baseplt Temp     7.865 D
PSK TX RF Out    1.805 W  	RC PSK BP Temp   1.814 D
RC PSK HPA Tmp   4.839 D  	+Y Array Temp    4.839 D
PSK TX HPA Tmp   3.629 D  	+Z Array Temp   18.756 D
Total Array C= 0.350 Bat Ch Cur=-0.072 Ifb= 0.049 I+10V= 0.371
TX:1009 BCR:80 PWRC:36D BT:1E WC:25 EDAC:E9

Beacon text:  	Happy 11th birthday to AO-16, LO-19, UO-14.
				AO-16 owned and operated by AMSAT-NA
				AO-16 Command Team <WJ9F>

A new WOD collection of current graphics along with general
information and telemetry samples can be found at:

www.telecable.es/personales/ea1bcu

[ANS thanks Miguel Menendez, EA1BCU, for AO-16 status information]

TMSAT-1 TO-31
Uplink 		145.925 MHz (9600 baud FSK)
Downlink 	436.925 MHz (9600 baud FSK)
Broadcast Callsign:	TMSAT1-11
BBS 			TMSAT1-12 
Launched: July 10, 1998 by a Zenit rocket from the Baikonur
Cosmodrome. Status: Non-operational, no data downlinked since
December 18, 2000.

Jim, AA7KC, reports small amounts of data downlinked (not decodable)
from TO-31.

Chris G7UPN, (UoSAT operations manager) reports the following
to ANS:

The TO-31 downlink will be off over most areas, with the exception of
Europe and Thailand. This is required to allow control stations to
recondition the battery with minimum power drain.

ProcMail V2.00G has been released by G7UPN. This software permits
the processing of image files from TO-31. It has been posted to the
AMSAT-NA FTP site at the following URL:

http://www.amsat.org/amsat/software/win32/wisp

Many of the high-resolution color images transmitted by TMSAT are
compressed using a UoSAT compression format. This format is
supported by the VK5HI CCD display program.

[ANS thanks Chris Jackson, G7UPN/ZL2TPO, for TO-31 status
information]

UoSAT-12 UO-36
Uplink      	145.960 MHz (9600 baud FSK)
Downlink    	437.025 MHz 437.400 MHz
Broadcast Callsign  	UO121-11
BBS             		UO121-12
Launched: April 21, 1999 by a Russian launcher from the Baikonur
Cosmodrome. Status: Semi-operational

UO-36 carries a number of imaging payloads, digital store-and-forward
communications and mode L/S transponders.

NASA has demonstrated on UO-36 the ability to use standard Internet
protocols to communicate with an orbiting spacecraft (just like any node
on the Internet). NASA has been developing this project by working with
the commercial payload aboard UoSAT-12.

The BBS is open, although uploading and downloading may be
disabled at times.

The VK5HI viewer shareware for UO-36 is available on the AMSAT-NA
web site at the following URL:

ftp://ftp.amsat.org/amsat/software/win32/display/ccddsp97-119.zip

Further information on UO-36 is available from: http://www.sstl.co.uk/

[ANS thanks Chris G7UPN/ZL2TPO, and the University of Surrey for
this information]

ITAMSAT IO-26
Uplink		145.875 145.900 145.925 145.950 MHz FM (1200 baud)
Downlink    	435.822 MHz SSB
Broadcast Callsign  	ITMSAT-11
BBS             		ITMSAT-12
Launched: September 26, 1993 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Semi-operational, the digipeater function is on
and open for APRS users.

[ANS thanks ITAMSAT Project Manager Alberto E. Zagni, I2KBD, for
IO-26 information]

/EX

SB SAT @ AMSAT $ANS-042.07
WEEKLY SATELLITE REPORT PART 3

AMSAT NEWS SERVICE BULLETIN 042.07 FROM AMSAT HQ
SILVER SPRING, MD, FEBRUARY 11, 2001
TO ALL RADIO AMATEURS
BID: $ANS-042.07

THE FOLLOWING ARE IN ORBIT BUT ARE NON-OPERATIONAL
AT THIS TIME:

SUNSAT SO-35
Mode J Uplink:	       	145.825 MHz FM
Mode J Downlink:	436.250 MHz FM

Mode B Uplink:		436.291 MHz FM
Mode B Downlink:	145.825 MHz FM
Launched: February 23, 1999 by a Delta II rocket from Vandenberg
Air Force Base in California. Status: Non-operational

The SunSat team released the following statement, dated
February 1, 2001:

We regret to announce that the last communication with SunSat from
our ground station at the Electronic Systems Laboratory at Stellenbosch
University took place recently. We are certain, after having performed
several tests since the last contact, that an irreversible, physical failure
has occurred on the satellite. It is therefore unlikely that we will have
any
further contact with SunSat, apart from the occasional visual sighting by
telescope!

When it was operational the SunSat package included 1200 and 9600
baud digital store-and-forward capability and a voice 'parrot' repeater
system in addition to Mode B/J operation with two VHF and two UHF
transmit-receive systems.

For more information on SunSat visit the following URL:

http://sunsat.ee.sun.ac.za

[ANS thanks Garth Milne, ZR1AFH, for this information]

RADIO SPORT RS-13
Uplink			21.260 to 21.300 MHz CW/SSB
Downlink 		145.860 to 145.900 MHz CW/SSB
Beacon 		145.860 MHz
Launched: February 5, 1991 aboard a Russian Cosmos C launcher
Status: non-operational (last operational in mode-T)

RS-12 was apparently re-activated recently. Prior to this switch RS-13
was operational (mode T), but was apparently turned off following
the recent RS-12 switch.

The latest information on RS-12 and RS-13 can be found on the
AC5DK RS-12/13 Satellite Operators page at:

http://www.qsl.net/ac5dk/rs1213/rs1213.html

[ANS thanks Kevin Manzer, AC5DK, for this information]

KITSAT KO-23
Uplink 		145.900 MHz FM (9600 baud FSK)
Downlink 	435.170 MHz FM
Broadcast Callsign	HLO1-11
BBS 			HLO1-12
Launched: August 10, 1992 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Intermittent operation with the downlink
transmitter operating at unpredictable intervals.

Jim, AA7KC, reports that KO-23's downlink transmitter continues
in non-operational status. Jim says that KO-23 shows some signs
of trying to recover, but no useful data has been downlinked. The
duration of this status is unpredictable. No data has been received
since October 28, 2000.

KyungHee Kim, HL0ENJ, reports (from the KO-23 control team) that part
of the problem with non-operation has been the power budget aboard
the satellite. "We are not sure when the bird might turn off again due to
insufficient power. The capability of the onboard power system has been
less and less," said Kim. HL0ENJ also noted that as of October 30, 2000
the onboard computer was reset and a reboot of operational software is
now underway.

Jeff, KB2WQM, reported to ANS that he noticed KO-23 transmitting a
solid carrier recently (no data), Mineo, JE9PEL, also reported receiving
KO-23 carrier signals.

[ANS thanks Jim Weisenberger, AA7KC, and KyungHee Kim, HL0ENJ,
for KO-23 status information]

TECHSAT-1B GO-32
Downlink 	435.225 MHz using HDLC telemetry
Launched: July 10, 1998 by a Russian Zenit rocket from the Baikonur
Cosmodrome. Status: Semi-operational.

Efforts were reported to be underway to bring GO-32 on line,
however, no information has been received by ANS (the last
report was dated November 1999).

Last reported, the satellite does transmit a 9600-baud burst every
30 seconds (the GO-32 beacon sends one short telemetry status
transmission of 44 bytes) and upon request the complete
telemetry buffer. 

[ANS has no further information]

PANSAT PO-34
Uplink/downlink frequencies have never been released
Launched: October 30, 1998 by the Shuttle Discovery
Status: Unknown

The satellite is not currently available for general uplink transmissions.

PanSat was developed by the Naval Postgraduate School. At the time of
launch, PanSat spread-spectrum digital transponders were promised to
be available to Amateur Radio operators along with software to utilize
this technology. To date, this has not happened.

For more information, visit the official PanSat web site at:

http://www.sp.nps.navy.mil/pansat/

PanSat was the featured cover article on the July/August 1999 issue
of the AMSAT-NA Journal (the story written by KD6DRA and N7HPR).

[ANS has no further information]

MIR SPACE STATION
145.985 MHz (FM) voice and SSTV (Robot 36 Mode)
Launched: February 18, 1986
Status: Unmanned

Currently, there is no human habitation aboard the station and the
onboard Amateur Radio equipment has been turned off.

Several news agencies are reporting the Mir space station will be ditched
in a controlled descent that will send it hurtling into a remote area of the
Pacific Ocean in early March 2001.

MIR SAFEX II 70-cm Repeater
Uplink 		435.750 MHz FM w/subaudible tone of 141.3 Hz
Downlink 	437.950 MHz FM
Status: Not operational. No operation in 1999 or 2000 has been observed

MIR SAFEX II 70-cm QSO Mode
Uplink 		435.725 MHz FM w/subaudible tone 151.4 Hz
Downlink 	437.925 MHz FM
Status: Not operational. No operation in 1999 or 2000 has been observed

[ANS has no further information]

DOVE DO-17
Downlink 	145.825 MHz FM (1200 baud AFSK)
		2401.220 MHz
Launched: January 22, 1990 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Non-operational.

DOVE has been in orbit for 11 years.

DOVE stopped transmitting in March 1998. The 145.825 MHz and
2401.220 MHz downlinks are off the air and the satellite has not
responded to ground station control.

[ANS has no further information]

WEBERSAT WO-18
Downlink 	437.104 MHz SSB (1200 baud PSK AX.25)
Launched: January 22, 1990 by an Ariane launcher from Kourou,
French Guiana. Status: Non-operational.

WO-18 has been in orbit for 11 years.

WO-18 was last reported to be in MBL mode after a software crash.

[ANS has no further information]

SEDSAT-1 SO-33
Downlink 	437.910 MHz FM (9600 baud FSK)
Launched: October 24, 1998 by a Delta 2 rocket from Cape
Canaveral, Florida. Status: Semi-operational.

The satellite is not currently available for uplink transmissions and
the image and transponder recovery efforts have been unsuccessful.

SedSat-1 signifies Students for the Exploration and Development of
Space (satellite number one).

SedSat-1 has downlinked months worth of telemetry data on the
performance of its electrical power system parameters. The Nickel
Metal Hydride batteries on the spacecraft were experimental and
experienced some abuse due to a power negative situation. This
information has provided NASA with useful information. With the
exception of the imaging system and the use of the transponders,
SedSat-1 has been judged a success.

For more information on SedSat-1 visit the satellite web site at the
following URL:

http://seds.uah.edu/projects/sedsat/sedsat.htm

[ANS has no further information]

/EX

--ANS END---

ANS would like to thank Mike Seguin, N1JEZ, ANS principal satellite
investigator, for helping provide current satellite information.

Please send any amateur satellite news or reports to:

ans-editor@amsat.org

Daniel (Dan) James
AMSAT News Service Bulletin Editor
AMSAT-NA Vice President/Public Affairs
Amateur callsign: NN0DJ
Grid Square EN28iv
Warroad, Minnesota U.S.A.
E-mail: nn0dj@amsat.org

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